Bench drill for drilling PCB's

Thread Starter

Davy

Joined Oct 2, 2005
0
I'm looking for a mini bench drill for drilling mainly PCB's, hole size will be 0.6mm from time to time but mainly I'll be using 0.8MM for 'through components'.

I've been looking at the Proxon 220TBM but worried about the over eating problem when used longer than 10 minutes, then I came across Xenox 220TBX, which is dearer because it comes in white rather than green, being exactly the same as the Proxon. The reason is that this one is used in laboratories and is not 'massed produced' being the 'daughter' of the Proxon .... I was thinking it was a better quality.

The ten minute use and 10 minutes rest worries me a little, so if anyone out there makes there own PCB's I'd be glad to hear any recommendations for a mini drill. I have heard that someone modified theirs by drilling vent holes and fixing a CPU fan.

Thanks, Dave
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,693
The better choice is an engraving spindle, the mini bench drills often have a little too high run out for precision work, unless you get precision type.
Max.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,088
It's not the size of the drill press that matters, it is its run-out and speed range that matters. I use a modified JET (when made in Japan, circa 1974) drill press capable of >1/2" holes in steel for PCB's with tiny drills: 1) The run-out is not too bad; and 2) I modified it to use a 3 PH motor with VFD drive. The standard 4-speed pulleys give me all that I would want (I use link-belt blet drives for smoothness). For PCB's you will not need the VFD. All similar drill presses are generally too fast for big holes.

A drill press is a very useful tool. One day, I may be drilling 3/4" holes for a weld mount and the next day holes for a snug fit with 24 AWG wire.

Get the best tool you can afford in the context that it will be one of your most used tools.
 

Thread Starter

Davy

Joined Oct 2, 2005
0
Why do you think the Proxon can only be used for 10 minutes? There are a lot of people using those to drill PCBs
I'd read it in the instructions and going on what other people have said.... maybe I'm reading too much, I could understand if they were drilling thick steel.

As mentioned, there's heck of a lot of people using them so they can't be 'that bad', for the price you can get a heftier bench drill capable of around 300 watt motor power at the expense of size. Just don't know whether to 'hang fire' or take my chances.

Thanks for all your replies, Dave
 

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
7,292
I drill all of my PCB's manually using a Dremel tool mounted hanging from a wall, with its flex shaft attached. My work table is about 3 ft high from the floor. I sit on a regular chair, then tape the PCB to a 1/4" thick piece of board, and start drilling with both my elbows leaning on the table. One hand guiding the tool to drill the holes, and the other one holding the weight of the flex shaft while also keeping it perfectly vertical... this technique has, at least for me, proven to be faster and more precise than using a bench drill. Also, I've drilled hundreds of holes in a row for far more than just 10 minutes at a time without a problem.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,685
One hand guiding the tool to drill the holes, and the other one holding the weight of the flex shaft while also keeping it perfectly vertical...
What size and type of bits are you using? HSS will tolerate some lateral force, but carbide will snap; especially the smaller sizes.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,088
Try something that's a little smaller than rebar, like a #76 for 24 awg wire. That's how I make my vias on DIY boards. Sounds like you should have been a pediatric vascular surgeon. Wait until you are a septuagenarian. :)
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,685
Same here ... either you're twice as skilled as I am ... or I'm twice as clumsy as you :D...
It's more likely that you've drilled more holes...

I injured my back 5 years ago in a motor vehicle accident and I don't think I could drill for 10 minutes in one sitting now.
 
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