Beginner project for lab

Thread Starter

Exjay

Joined Nov 19, 2015
76
I'm trying to build a power supply for my mini lab. I don't wanna spend much at it. However, I have necessary components like LM723, LM317, transformers and other components. But I want my design to have both polarity, over-current protection, short circuit protection and reverse protection. The voltage I want is 0 to +/-24v and current up to 2/3A.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,861
Do you have an appropriate transformer?

Do you want the negative supply to be independent of the positive supply? Or tracking?

If you have detailed questions, post your schematic.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,495
When my activity in electronics was reawakened a few years back, I bought a Motorola 744203030001 wall-wart (Ault # 5712-305-4C3E) from some surplus dealer (Jameco?). It supplied +12, +5, and -12V. None of which were capable of more than 0.5 A. It sufficed for more than 10 years, at which time, I bought a used, variable voltage supply with current monitoring.

1) For electronics, your specification for current seems high by today's needs.
2) What do you plan to do? Power circuits? Logic/MCU circuits?

My advice is to buy a regulated wall wart and get on to the real fun. Power supplies are quite sophisticated, and in my opinion, are a poor place to start.

If you were closer, I would send that original supply to you as a freebie.
 

Thread Starter

Exjay

Joined Nov 19, 2015
76
Do you have an appropriate transformer?

Do you want the negative supply to be independent of the positive supply? Or tracking?

If you have detailed questions, post your schematic.
Yes I have a transformer and I want my power supply to be independent
 

Thread Starter

Exjay

Joined Nov 19, 2015
76
When my activity in electronics was reawakened a few years back, I bought a Motorola 744203030001 wall-wart (Ault # 5712-305-4C3E) from some surplus dealer (Jameco?). It supplied +12, +5, and -12V. None of which were capable of more than 0.5 A. It sufficed for more than 10 years, at which time, I bought a used, variable voltage supply with current monitoring.

1) For electronics, your specification for current seems high by today's needs.
2) What do you plan to do? Power circuits? Logic/MCU circuits?

My advice is to buy a regulated wall wart and get on to the real fun. Power supplies are quite sophisticated, and in my opinion, are a poor place to start.

If you were closer, I would send that original supply to you as a freebie.
I want to start building electronics project. The wall wart has a fixed voltages but with this design I can turn my knob to any voltage
 
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