4 wires audio cable: green blue red and copper ? how to solder to audio jack?

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noob_learning

Joined May 27, 2017
1
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I am trying to fix my broken headphones. It has 4 wires: blue , green , blue, and gold (copper).

My audio jack is a normal model, I know I must connect the copper to the ground connector, the red to the right connector, and green would be left ( or is it blue ? ) Would like some information about how I can do this. Also should I burn the little white "hair" which is coming out of each wire ? You can see them on the photo. Thanks.audio jack.jpg
 
each wire is the + and - of each speaker. you'll have to figure out which is which and solder the left + and the right + to their points on your replacment TRRS cable. the - wires can be bridged as ground on a 3 wire cord. however, this fibre wire that is used in many headphones is almost impossible to splice and solder. you really need to replace the entire cord or buy new headphones
 
each wire is the + and - of each speaker. you'll have to figure out which is which and solder the left + and the right + to their points on your replacment TRRS cable. the - wires can be bridged as ground on a 3 wire cord. however, this fibre wire that is used in many headphones is almost impossible to splice and solder. you really need to replace the entire cord or buy new headphones
this is fery fine wire impregnated with cotton string. getting solder to stick and conduct is difficult
 

Deepak@123

Joined Dec 30, 2019
1
Each earpiece or ear bud has two wires. These are colour coded so that they can be identified at the other end of the cord. I prefer to call them ‘live’ and ‘ground’. Others use + and - . (The signal applied is AC so I think this is inappropriate.)
It is important that the earpieces are wired the same way round. The keeps the phase and movement of the diaphragms (the parts that produce the sound) the same. When one is reversed and they are ‘out of phase’ the audio effect is very strange and unpleasant. (If you reverse them both they are back in phase and all is ok!)
At the jack end the ground wires are both connected to the body of the plug. The left live is connected to the tip and the right live is connected to the ring.
With four connection plugs and sockets the ear phone arrangement is the same, so as to ensure compatibility and the extra ring (nearer to the body) becomes ground and the body is connected to a microphone built into the headset. This connection carries a small positive voltage from a high resistance source (to power the electret microphone). Fitting a three connection plug that shorts this to ground does not cause a malfunction or significant waste of power.
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Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
7,098
One quick test you can do is measure the resistance between the wires with the plug end NOT plugged into anything. The plug itself (which you didn't picture) (likely) has three contact points. Two of those wires will go to the largest part of the plug, meaning you'll get almost zero resistance between those two wires and between either of those same wires to the ground portion of the plug. THE OTHER TWO WIRES will not be common to anything but either the tip of the plug and the middle ring. Once you know which wires are which you can rewire your headphones. The two wires I focused on at first are the common wires (or ground). One of those two wires goes to one headphone speaker and the other wire goes to the other speaker. The other two wires go - one to one speaker and the other to the other speaker.

You have a 50/50 chance of getting left and right on the correct side. But if you should get them backwards, there's not going to be much difference unless you're watching something with surround sound. You may hear a car approaching from the left and see it enter into screen from the right. If you can live with that - - - . Like I said, you have a 50/50 chance of getting it right.

As for those tiny strands of wire, I've tried to solder them. The best I've ever achieved was to get a blob of solder with those wires stuck into the blob. VERY difficult to solder. If at all.
 
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