2.5V 100F Super Farah Capacitor Module 15V 16.6F Automotive Rectifier

Thread Starter

Technikal

Joined Jan 1, 2021
11
Have you got the biggest alternator and battery fitted? I see there's a 225 Amp alternator that fits some model of the Mondeo. You've identified the problem - not charging enough while driving. The solution would be charge more. That needs a bigger battery to handle the current without breaking down. You will not charge more by fitting capacitors, the battery will deteriorate if it's not getting enough charge, the capacitors just delay the point where the battery stops working. I don't like the idea of 'warming up' the engine - sludge condenses in the exhaust and 5 minutes driving may not blow it out. Best to drive off after a few seconds when the oil has had a chance to get pushed around. How long does it take to crank the engine? is there a problem there? my petrol car cranks for 0.7 seconds according to the mechanic (the printout from his automated electrical system tester), the alternator will put that back in the first 30 seconds of driving. I think you need to fix the cause of the problem rather than bandaiding the symptoms.
just changed battery to a Varta , when i start the car , the andriod mirror stays on . but the LED intirior light still flashes when crancking .
i feel if the starter motor could be worn and demanding too much amps to push
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
810
Usually the problem is either, under-sized/damaged Battery Cables, or,
poor Battery Cable/Terminal connections.

There is also the factor of Grounds, and where the Fuse-Box is connected in the system.
There may be multiple Positive or Negative Connections,
""usually"" the car manufacturer has these factors pretty well sorted out, but not always.
And then there is the factor of various ""repairs"" that may have been done to the wiring system by others.

Here are "The Rules".......

1) There MUST BE a HEAVY Ground wire running directly between
the Battery Negative Terminal and the Engine-Block or Transmission Housing.
This Wire must be at least #4-AWG,
#2-AWG is recommended, but is usually only found on Diesel Powered Trucks.
All powered devices will experience the Voltage-Drop created within this Cable while starting the Engine.
Bigger is always Better.

2) The same goes for the Positive Cable, except that it runs directly to the Starter Motor.
Accessories powered directly from the Battery will not suffer the Voltage-Drop on this Cable while starting,
but will still see the internal Battery Voltage-Drop while starting.
Bigger is always Better. (wiring and Battery size)

3) The Frame Rails, and/or, the Sheet Metal Body of the Car, should be Grounded to
the Engine-Block, with a #4-AWG Battery Cable.
( 2 separate Cables in the case of a Car with a separate Frame and Body ),
( 1 Cable in the case of a Car using "Uni-Body" construction )

4) All "High-Current", (~5+Amps), Loads in the Car should be Grounded to the Engine-Block.

5) Never Ground ANYTHING to the Car Body Sheet-Metal, you are just asking for trouble.
Car manufacturers do this all the time to save money on Wire.
It is a very bad practice.
The Wiring Harness in the Car is the most expensive part of the car manufacturing process,
so the manufacturers are always looking for places where they can "cut-corners" and save a few Pennies.

6) The Alternator Output Stud or Connector should be directly connected to either the
Positive Terminal of the Battery, or to the Starter Power Input Terminal,
with an appropriately sized Fuse (or "Fusible-Wire-Link") ON BOTH ENDS OF THE WIRE.
This Wire should be a MINIMUM size of #6-AWG for most average Cars.
If the Alternator is rated at ~100-Amps or more, a #4-AWG Battery Cable is needed.
Bigger is always Better.

7) Now it comes down to choosing the best place for the
main feed(s) to the Fuse-Block(s), and, the main feed(s) to the Ignition Switch.
Ideally, these should all go directly to the Battery Positive Terminal, (with heavy in-line Fuses),
but it may be acceptable to obtain these feeds from the Alternator Output, or, the Starter Input.

8) You will find that the manufacturer of your Car has NOT
followed some, or maybe even ANY, of these rules, to save a few pennies on production costs.
Anywhere these rules have not been followed, you can expect a potential problem,
or, at the very least, "less than ideal" performance.
It is a very good idea to obtain a complete Wiring Schematic for your Car and study it carefully.
.
.
.
 
If your vehicle is being used simply as a commuter car and driving less than 250 miles each day (as you obviously are), then do yourself a favor and buy an electric car. Simplify your life. Most new EVs have a range of at least 250 miles and many now approach and exceed 400 miles. Hell, Tesla and Lucid are both introducing models later this year with over 500 miles of range (they do tend to be rather pricey though). Refueling is done at home and only takes two seconds, one second to plug it in before going to bed and one second to unplug it before leaving in the morning. Full tank every morning, warmed and defrosted before opening your garage door. No starter battery to worry about, no alternator or engine coolant systems to speak of, no accessory belts pumps or pulleys, no mechanical water pumps, no power steering pumps or hydraulic PS fluid (EVs use electronic power assist steering), no fuel pumps or oil pumps, no fuel or oil filters, no ignition control systems, coil packs, plug wires or spark plugs, no fuel injection control systems, fuel lines, MAF sensors or injectors, no emission control systems, O2 sensors, mufflers or pipes, no transmission so no tranny oil, and NO EMISSIONS TESTING EVER. With virtually ZERO routine maintenance and new Li-ion battery packs lasting well over 300,000 miles there's nothing left to do but drive it. Very little reason to worry over wear and tear of the drive train, they'll last forever. Mechanically speaking you literally can't kill the dang things. If you don't mind driving an ugly car buy a used Leaf. They're known to be incredibly reliable and one of the lowest cost to own vehicles. They're also dirt cheap now even if you have to buy a new battery (reconditioned battery packs are now available for only $2800). They make the best beater cars. Start enjoying Peace of Mind. You have better things to do with your time than spend it maintaining a car. ICE cars are for hobbyists :)
 

Thread Starter

Technikal

Joined Jan 1, 2021
11
Usually the problem is either, under-sized/damaged Battery Cables, or,
poor Battery Cable/Terminal connections.

There is also the factor of Grounds, and where the Fuse-Box is connected in the system.
There may be multiple Positive or Negative Connections,
""usually"" the car manufacturer has these factors pretty well sorted out, but not always.
And then there is the factor of various ""repairs"" that may have been done to the wiring system by others.

Here are "The Rules".......

1) There MUST BE a HEAVY Ground wire running directly between
the Battery Negative Terminal and the Engine-Block or Transmission Housing.
This Wire must be at least #4-AWG,
#2-AWG is recommended, but is usually only found on Diesel Powered Trucks.
All powered devices will experience the Voltage-Drop created within this Cable while starting the Engine.
Bigger is always Better.

2) The same goes for the Positive Cable, except that it runs directly to the Starter Motor.
Accessories powered directly from the Battery will not suffer the Voltage-Drop on this Cable while starting,
but will still see the internal Battery Voltage-Drop while starting.
Bigger is always Better. (wiring and Battery size)

3) The Frame Rails, and/or, the Sheet Metal Body of the Car, should be Grounded to
the Engine-Block, with a #4-AWG Battery Cable.
( 2 separate Cables in the case of a Car with a separate Frame and Body ),
( 1 Cable in the case of a Car using "Uni-Body" construction )

4) All "High-Current", (~5+Amps), Loads in the Car should be Grounded to the Engine-Block.

5) Never Ground ANYTHING to the Car Body Sheet-Metal, you are just asking for trouble.
Car manufacturers do this all the time to save money on Wire.
It is a very bad practice.
The Wiring Harness in the Car is the most expensive part of the car manufacturing process,
so the manufacturers are always looking for places where they can "cut-corners" and save a few Pennies.

6) The Alternator Output Stud or Connector should be directly connected to either the
Positive Terminal of the Battery, or to the Starter Power Input Terminal,
with an appropriately sized Fuse (or "Fusible-Wire-Link") ON BOTH ENDS OF THE WIRE.
This Wire should be a MINIMUM size of #6-AWG for most average Cars.
If the Alternator is rated at ~100-Amps or more, a #4-AWG Battery Cable is needed.
Bigger is always Better.

7) Now it comes down to choosing the best place for the
main feed(s) to the Fuse-Block(s), and, the main feed(s) to the Ignition Switch.
Ideally, these should all go directly to the Battery Positive Terminal, (with heavy in-line Fuses),
but it may be acceptable to obtain these feeds from the Alternator Output, or, the Starter Input.

8) You will find that the manufacturer of your Car has NOT
followed some, or maybe even ANY, of these rules, to save a few pennies on production costs.
Anywhere these rules have not been followed, you can expect a potential problem,
or, at the very least, "less than ideal" performance.
It is a very good idea to obtain a complete Wiring Schematic for your Car and study it carefully.
.
.
.
I Will get all above checked , thanks for your help
 

MIS42N

Joined Jan 25, 2013
17
Refueling is done at home and only takes two seconds, one second to plug it in before going to bed and one second to unplug it before leaving in the morning. Full tank every morning, warmed and defrosted before opening your garage door....
You might note the man said he had no garage or driveway when the suggestion was made to trickle charge overnight.
 

Thread Starter

Technikal

Joined Jan 1, 2021
11
I have just got the a better new battery fitted .
F18 Varta Silver Dynamic Car Battery 85Ah .
Madeno real differance , but due to me now leaving car started 5 mins then drive 5 mins to work ( 4 miles away ) then leaving car started another 5 mins or less, the andriod mirror stays on fine in morning but anoying is the LED internal bulb which flashes when starting the car ( the voltage in morning shows 12.6V then drops to about 10V when turning ignition on , 3 secs later shows 11.8 - 12.2V . I Crack the car and V drops to about 10.0V , car starts and whith in 15 - 20 seconds Voltage goes back up to 14.8 - 15v. 14 .6 - 15.1v is the avrage Voltage showing in dash when idle or driving .
I hope to make a video next morning , hopefully to view and also show the suplimentry heater power level ( which goes up slowly , but full when reved ).
 
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