120VAC thru a metal plate.

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GetDeviceInfo

Joined Jun 7, 2009
2,190
Just a heads up that you have two Canadians chatting US code. A 'plate with wires run through it' isnt a clause in the code. There are a number of instances where bonding is required, generally regarded as electrical equipment, and things that could become electrified. A plate with a wire through it on its own, fails to categorize it either way, without context. Do you have a picture maybe.
 

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123Ken123

Joined Apr 8, 2022
56
Just a heads up that you have two Canadians chatting US code. A 'plate with wires run through it' isnt a clause in the code. There are a number of instances where bonding is required, generally regarded as electrical equipment, and things that could become electrified. A plate with a wire through it on its own, fails to categorize it either way, without context. Do you have a picture maybe.
Remember the key statement is " "120VAC" running thru a metal plate" This is full context and applies to all applications and also is fully categorized. Is this enough information to answer the question? REF: For a 120VAC running thru a metal plate must the 120VAC ground be bonded to the plate as a NEC requirement?
 

GetDeviceInfo

Joined Jun 7, 2009
2,190
Remember the key statement is " "120VAC" running thru a metal plate" This is full context and applies to all applications and also is fully categorized. Is this enough information to answer the question? REF: For a 120VAC running thru a metal plate must the 120VAC ground be bonded to the plate as a NEC requirement?
well there you go. I'd be interested in the answer when you find it :)
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
5,020
Wouldn't the metal plate be considered as a busbar? One of the days I'll have to dig through all those boxes from my office at work for my old codebook...
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
10,124
MaxHeadroom is the expert here, but if you ground the plate, how can it have 120 VAC on it? A diagram would be helpful in understanding your question.
 

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123Ken123

Joined Apr 8, 2022
56
MaxHeadroom is the expert here, but if you ground the plate, how can it have 120 VAC on it? A diagram would be helpful in understanding your question.
Correct, if the plate is bonded grounded then if 120vac is placed on the plate the short circuit current will open the circuit and the plate will not have a floating hot.
 

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123Ken123

Joined Apr 8, 2022
56
Just for safety and expediency, go ahead and earth ground the plate.
It will cover all bases and set your mind at rest! :rolleyes:
It has everything to do with the NEC, not my mind. Earth ground is a resistance ground and may not open a CB if a short occurs. Must have an direct wire bonded ground per the NEC.
 
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Jon Chandler

Joined Jun 12, 2008
998
This thread and all the related ones seem like problems looking for a place to fit.

If "120VAC running through a plate" means a cable running through a hole in a metal plate (as opposed to the plate acting as a buss bar as some have interpreted) then let's consider an extreme example...

If a cable runs through a wall with metal studs, do the studs have to be tied to ground? It's conceivable that a conductor could short to a stud AND a sheet rock screw in that stud be exposed if the wall is damaged AND a person walking by barefoot on a concrete floor touch the exposed sheet rock screw.....
 

Thread Starter

123Ken123

Joined Apr 8, 2022
56
This thread and all the related ones seem like problems looking for a place to fit.

If "120VAC running through a plate" means a cable running through a hole in a metal plate (as opposed to the plate acting as a buss bar as some have interpreted) then let's consider an extreme example...

If a cable runs through a wall with metal studs, do the studs have to be tied to ground? It's conceivable that a conductor could short to a stud AND a sheet rock screw in that stud be exposed if the wall is damaged AND a person walking by barefoot on a concrete floor touch the exposed sheet rock screw.....
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Obviously you have not read article 500 of the NEC. Read it and your extreme does not apply. So far no one has read it yet and are very ignorant of it including you.
 

Thread Starter

123Ken123

Joined Apr 8, 2022
56
This thread and all the related ones seem like problems looking for a place to fit.

If "120VAC running through a plate" means a cable running through a hole in a metal plate (as opposed to the plate acting as a buss bar as some have interpreted) then let's consider an extreme example...

If a cable runs through a wall with metal studs, do the studs have to be tied to ground? It's conceivable that a conductor could short to a stud AND a sheet rock screw in that stud be exposed if the wall is damaged AND a person walking by barefoot on a concrete floor touch the exposed sheet rock screw.....
Does the NEC dictate the studs have to be grounded? Read article 500 of the NEC and reply.
 
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