Wire Glue

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
2,341
I found this on Amazon
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075XSCC8K/ref=ox_sc_act_image_1?smid=A2GW035X4F1798&psc=1

It Says it is for everything but I do not See Wiring.

If I have 2. Insulated Wires will this keep them to gather?

It is Silicone Glue or is this not what You Told Me about?
It’s really impossible to know if this particular adhesive is appropriate because there is almost no information about what is actually in the tube.

Search amazon for “electronics grade silicone” and you will find many options.
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,581
I discovered the hard way that some silicon glues and caulking materials contain ammonia and other chemicals that cause them to be conductive, especially before they are fully cured so make sure that whatever you choose is recommended for electrical use.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,201
So do you want to make an electrical connection between two wire? Or just keep them right next to each other? I have kept wires next to each other with that clear cement used for plastic water pipes. I have also used it to repair sections of extension cords where the outer jacket has been damaged. It is flexible a bit and so it does not crack when it is bent. And it is water proof, which is handy. And it is reasonably priced as well
 

Thread Starter

biferi

Joined Apr 14, 2017
46
I found Silicone Glue on Amazon.com and it may not work.

They Told Me it is not Conductive and will not work for Wire Ends.

Can You help Me find the Glue I need on Amazon.com?
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,623
Forget using silicone for electrical connections.
The recognized methods are crimp, screw terminal and soldered, on large conductor cables, soldered terminals lugs are no longer allowed.
 
Revisions and repairs on printed circuit boards have been done with wire soldered on for many years. But the solder connections do require removal of the solder resist coating and that is not always easy or simple.To make the addition stable my company would always bond the wires to the board with super glue,(cyanoacrylate glue).
There was, at one time, a board repair fluid that was conductive by means of very fine silver powder and some adhesive that allowed the silver particles to contact each other. But I have not seen that advertised for over 20 years, so it may no longer be available. Certainly, soldered wiresare a far better method, IF the soldering is done correctly.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
2,341
There are conductive epoxies that are very good and readily available but they are not general purpose. They are useful for specific applications and I have no idea if the TS needs an glue or something else but if I had to bet, I'd bet against glue.
 
I have soldered welding cables successfully, they were the ones with the fine-stranded copper wire core about 9/16 inches in diameter. We soldered them for two main reasons, first, because we had no crimpers, and second, because new crimp terminals were not available. The soldering did require an oxy/acetelyn torch and a a fair amount of time and solder, but the results were quite satisfactory and the cables worked well and lasted until they were mechanically damaged by fools. The they were repaired again, re-using the same terminals.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,623
I have soldered welding cables successfully, they were the ones with the fine-stranded copper wire core about 9/16 inches in diameter. We soldered them for two main reasons, first, because we had no crimpers, and second, because new crimp terminals were not available. The soldering did require an oxy/acetelyn torch and a a fair amount of time and solder, but the results were quite satisfactory and the cables worked well and lasted until they were mechanically damaged by fools. The they were repaired again, re-using the same terminals.
Yeah, that was the way it was done in the Old Days, but no longer permissible, if it were inspected!
At least for power distribution.
(AKA potted terminals.)
 
Yeah, that was the way it was done in the Old Days, but no longer permissible, if it were inspected!
At least for power distribution.
(AKA potted terminals.)
These were WELDING cables from the welder, NOT power distribution cables. Big difference, really. In addition, I have seen quite a few wrong crimp connections, some that looked OK but were not. A crimp needs to be exactly right to be OK, while a solder joint can be reheated if it is not right. And if the crimp joint is not perfect cut off that darn expensive connector and $lots for another one, plus now the wires are too short.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,623
I have seen quite a few wrong crimp connections, some that looked OK but were not. A crimp needs to be exactly right to be OK, while a solder joint can be reheated if it is not right.
This is why you use the right swaging tool for the job!
At this point, It is unknown as to whether the OP is referring to a pair of head phone leads or 50amp distribution cables!

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shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
8,429
while a solder joint can be reheated if it is not right. And if the crimp joint is not perfect cut off that darn expensive connector
Glad you weren't doing things for me. Solder in a welding cable? The amount of solder and flux migrating into the cable would make the rod clamp so stiff to use the poor guy doing the welding would be cussing you every day.
 
Glad you weren't doing things for me. Solder in a welding cable? The amount of solder and flux migrating into the cable would make the rod clamp so stiff to use the poor guy doing the welding would be cussing you every day.
As a matter of fact, that was not the case at all. None of the solder or flux got beyond the housing. We used an oxy-axcetylene torch and so there was enough heat to do the job quickly. Also, both of us who worked on it were very experienced at soldering. The secret is to apply the heat in the correct place, and apply the solder and the flux also in the correct location, and to only use exactly the right amount of heat.
And besides all of that, it was the ground clamp and the ground connection.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,623
That is a rather expensive crimping tool in the picture, and it is not even the one for the bigger terminals.
We used an oxy-axcetylene torch
When i worked in power distribution, we did not have the luxury of trucking an Oxy/Acetylene cart around, hence the Crimper!
Besides, during this time, the Regs changed to crimp only.
 
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