Will pay someone to create this circuit for Nutone Intercom circuit adapter for Ring Doorbell

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by PeterUbers, Mar 16, 2019 at 6:35 PM.

  1. PeterUbers

    Thread Starter New Member

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    I am looking for someone to create this for my personal home, please review the youtube videos:





    I have the exact model Nutone system as in the youtube videos above and want to add a Ring doorbell to my system.

    I'll pay you what you think is fair to create the circuit board that this gentleman produced in order to get his wifi ring doorbell to work with his Nutone system. I am willing to sign a document to free you of any liability in case anything gets damaged during my installation of your circuit board.

    Thanks for considering. Please contact me if interested
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    The big problem with the project is that it lacks an appropriate bill of materials. For example the 200 uF capacitor was implemented in the video by 2 100 uf Capacitors. In order to do a PCB layout, I need to rundown mechanical information for each electrical and mechanical part. I need to know the board dimensions and what kind of a case it will be placed in. Does the 18VAC transformer have to be on the board and is the primary 120VAC or 230 VAC? A whole lot more engineering is required. All in all I think about $5000.00 and 100 hours should be about right including a couple of prototype boards.

    In order to do this on a budget, if you could provide the designer with a suitable bill of materials you might get it done for a lot less.

    You could also use one of these and be done with it.
    http://documents.opto22.com/0451_Std_Dig_DC_Inputs_data_sheet.pdf
    http://documents.opto22.com/0253_G4_Digital_DC_Inputs_data_sheet.pdf
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019 at 7:36 PM
  3. PeterUbers

    Thread Starter New Member

    Yesterday
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    Hi

    The transformer is already in the nutone master unit as depicted in the video. This is 120 volt system, USA.

    I am not an expert hence I queried your forum, but the YouTube member claims he spent $26.00 USD on parts and he provided the circuit design as you have seen.

    Thanks for considering and thanks for your feedback, I would pay someone $250-500 plus shipping to do this project
     
  4. Raymond Genovese

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 5, 2016
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    Do you mean a one-time circuit for your use or a board design for manufacturing?

    This is a simple one evening project that you can build as a learn-to-solder-for-fun project.

    The BOM from the author of the video is:
    Parts list: 25-Ohm 50W wire round resistor; 4x1N4004 rectifier diodes, 200uF 50V capacitor, 4.7K 1W resistor, 1.2K (adjust per selected SS relay) 1W resistor, opto-isolated solid state relay of your choice to work in your specific circuit. I used a Panasonic AQY282SX

    I don't even see $26 of parts. Why not give it a shot, you might have fun and, as an added bonus, you can blame yourself if it does not work :)
     
  5. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    I do not believe anyone is going to take you up on the offer for that price. Yes the parts are not expensive, but it is no good having a board on which the parts you have DO NOT FIT. Believe me when I say, having to get a board fabbed twice will ruin your day. There are several parts which are not mentioned on the schematic, but probably should be there and for the life of me I don't know why the original designer thinks a 50W resistor is a good idea. I really don't think you need one that big and that is where most of the cost is.
     
  6. Raymond Genovese

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 5, 2016
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    I looked at that 50W resistor as well...he knows that "the power calculation is about 12 W". Maybe that is what he had handy. Is the TS looking for one circuit for himself? That is how I read it..

     
  7. PeterUbers

    Thread Starter New Member

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    Hi

    This is a one time one project item for my home, $500 wouldn't be worth it to someone ?
     
  8. Raymond Genovese

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 5, 2016
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    Well, I wouldn't be interested. It is not a complicated circuit and I think that even I understand what he is doing although I did not look that carefully....taking the 18VAC from the existing doorbell, rectifying it, dropping it and using it to turn on the LED of a photoMOS optoisolator that will tell the Ring system that the doorbell was pressed.

    Frankly, and I really don't want to seem like I am insulting you, but it is suspicious that you would be willing to pay so much for that...and, it is not guaranteed to work in your system, even though I believe that the author of the video built it and it works for him.

    I was serious that you could build it as a nice beginner project - no?
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019 at 11:54 PM
  9. PeterUbers

    Thread Starter New Member

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    I totally understand your concern. Thanks for your input; this is a challenging task to find a specialist to perform and I want an end product and am willing to pay a certain amount for it.
     
  10. Travm

    Member

    Aug 16, 2016
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    One offs are risky. Take the risk with your own time, or pay what it costs. $500 USD is what a small mistake or misjudgment would cost. Anyone doing this for profit would have to charge 3 to 5 times this to even hope to profit on this job.
    I could make you a board and solder the components to it for $500.
    If you want it to work. $5000 is more appropriate.
     
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  11. PeterUbers

    Thread Starter New Member

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    What do you think of the YouTube guy that got it to work for $26?
     
  12. PeterUbers

    Thread Starter New Member

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    I'm not understanding why $5000.00 is what it would cost to make this "work." But again, admittedly, I don't understand the nuances, I've certainly used RadioShack parts like relays and diodes when I did a lot of car stereo and remote starter installations but I just don't have the time to do this.


    Thanks to all for the discussion
     
  13. Papabravo

    Expert

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    That's really not the question. Ask him how much his time is worth, and how many hours it took to complete the project. The $26 is a tiny fraction of those other costs; probably less than 50 basis points.
     
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  14. PeterUbers

    Thread Starter New Member

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    I see what you're saying, I understand. Thank you for your feedback.
     
  15. Sensacell

    Moderator

    Jun 19, 2012
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    I know that $5000.00 number looks ridiculous to the average person, but it's really rather accurate, and appropriate.

    If you have the skills to perform this project correctly and efficiently, you have an expensive skill set that can command a high wage.
    There are also risk factors that one needs to consider, things often go wrong, requiring a second spin at the design- all of which costs money.

    When you add up all the time and direct expenses, it's an expensive game.

    Ready-made consumer goods spread these costs over thousands of units, most people have little conception of how expensive any type of custom development really is.
     
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  16. Papabravo

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    If you scan through all the messages on this forum and pick out the ones with similar request/response patterns there will be few, if any successful custom developments where the TS and responder agreed on a price and both parties were satisfied with the result. The usual disparity in price is about 10:1. People requesting the work and people doing the work have radically different estimates of the time involved in making a working unit.
     
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  17. Raymond Genovese

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 5, 2016
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    You know, that is an interesting point and I had not considered it that way. I was being much more literal. That is, build me this circuit on a perfboard/bread board or whatever.

    It is not that I didn't consider the, "it must work" part, as I mentioned in my original and subsequent response that it might, in fact, not work. Not being argumentative, for the sake of being argumentative, just noting why contracts and specifications and the like, exist.
     
  18. Travm

    Member

    Aug 16, 2016
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    He took the risks himself. I didn't watch the video, and I'm not an electrical designer. But I do work for a company that does custom mechanical work. One off designs are expensive.
    If your paying someone to do this, they have to make sure it will work, that you'll be happy with it, and that it is safe. Joe YouTuber got it to work once on a video, maybe it really is that easy. Maybe not.
    People who do this professionally won't do cheap poor quality work, $500 would not be profitable for a custom design like this done properly.
     
  19. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    Video is almost inaudible to me. Anyone else?
     
  20. PeterUbers

    Thread Starter New Member

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    Very good points by all.

    I can totally understand now the disparity. And as I think about all the projects I did myself sometimes they would take 20-30 hours and yes I would go tell my friends I did it for $25 instead of paying a pro "$500" but yes
    1. I took on the risk and troubleshooting
    2. I did not assign an hourly rate for myself
    3. I did not worry about ... will it fail in a week


    Thanks guys
     
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