Why is Fuzzy logic preferred over Neural Network in embedded systems?

Thread Starter

rudha13

Joined Sep 6, 2015
14
hello all,
I recently came upon this doubt. While going through the embedded system found in a washing machine( for clothes), I was confused as to why most of the machines used a fuzzy logic algorithm rather than a neural network algorithm when the latter has more pros compared to the former?
 

JohnInTX

Joined Jun 26, 2012
4,198
hello all,
I recently came upon this doubt. While going through the embedded system found in a washing machine( for clothes), I was confused as to why most of the machines used a fuzzy logic algorithm rather than a neural network algorithm when the latter has more pros compared to the former?
I guess you'd have to be more specific in how each was implemented. The few times I was asked to use Fuzzy in a product was more of a marketing thing than anything else although the graphical rules generation was kind of neat.
FWIW, The redoubtable Bob Pease takes on Fuzzy Logic (and some neural network stuff) here: http://electronicdesign.com/digital-ics/whats-all-fuzzy-logic-stuff-anyhow
I'm not sure why you'd need either for a washing machine. What does the machine's maker say about the supposed advantages of Fuzzy?
 
Last edited:

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,012
hello all,
I recently came upon this doubt. While going through the embedded system found in a washing machine( for clothes), I was confused as to why most of the machines used a fuzzy logic algorithm rather than a neural network algorithm when the latter has more pros compared to the former?
Probably because licensing a neural network protocol is too expensive, overkill for a washing machine and the phrase, "fuzzy logic" did beater with a focus group of potential customers than the lower tech sounding phrase, "neural network". "Neural network" sounds a bit scary to the average consumer - like their washing machine is connected to the "network" and some Chinese government employee is monitoring their every move through that machine.
 

Thread Starter

rudha13

Joined Sep 6, 2015
14
I guess you'd have to be more specific in how each was implemented. The few times I was asked to use Fuzzy in a product was more of a marketing thing than anything else although the graphical rules generation was kind of neat.
FWIW, The redoubtable Bob Pease takes on Fuzzy Logic (and some neural network stuff) here: http://electronicdesign.com/digital-ics/whats-all-fuzzy-logic-stuff-anyhow
I'm not sure why you'd need either for a washing machine. What does the machine's maker say about the supposed advantages of Fuzzy?
well, i thought that the fuzzy logic was more user-friendly than the neural type. But then, I decided to post this question anyway, after doubts that my understanding was far too simple to be considered true from an engineering or a technical viewpoint.
Thank you anyway..!
 

Thread Starter

rudha13

Joined Sep 6, 2015
14
Probably because licensing a neural network protocol is too expensive, overkill for a washing machine and the phrase, "fuzzy logic" did beater with a focus group of potential customers than the lower tech sounding phrase, "neural network". "Neural network" sounds a bit scary to the average consumer - like their washing machine is connected to the "network" and some Chinese government employee is monitoring their every move through that machine.
Hahaha..! Well, I suppose that its another way of looking into this, albeit a creative and a weird one..! I would agree with what you said in your first line regarding expensive licensing required for the neural network type. I never thought about it that way.
Thank you anyway..!
P.S- I am pretty sure that a neural network doesn't work that way.
 
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