What's the function of this component

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
17,161
hi Ifeco,
Its purpose is to rectify the AC [alternating voltage] input from the transformer, into a DC voltage output.
I will post a sketch later, it should help you understand its operation.
E
EDIT:
This video is better than a sketch.

 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

Ifeco

Joined Jul 29, 2018
6
hi Ifeco,
Its purpose is to rectify the AC [alternating voltage] input from the transformer, into a DC voltage output.
I will post a sketch later, it should help you understand its operation.
E
EDIT:
This video is better than a sketch.


Bro thanks so much. Why I needed to know about this component is ... the circuit where I found it is powdered by AC ... and I want to see how I can modify it so as to power it with 18650 batteries
 

JohanEricson

Joined Aug 30, 2017
36
To power it from 18650 batteries you should be able to just connect the batteries where the AC is connected, it would just mean that the already direct current (DC) from the batteries is flowing thourgh one side of the rectifier bridge. But if you would like to get rid of the assumed losses in the bridge you could just connect the batteries where the output of the component you're speaking of is connected. Just bypass the rectifing bridge.

If the device uses both positive and negative DC-levels it will be a bit different though.

Someone please correct me if i'm wrong.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
17,161
hi Johan,
Sounds OK to me, for single positive supply.
Providing he never connects the transformer to the mains supply, he could just connect the battery across the bridge output terminals.
E
 

Thread Starter

Ifeco

Joined Jul 29, 2018
6
hi Johan,
Sounds OK to me, for single positive supply.
Providing he never connects the transformer to the mains supply, he could just connect the battery across the bridge output terminals.
E
Hi Eric! Good job you are doing.... but this component is positioned at the AC input just after a fuse and a capacitor ....I think is a transformerless rectifier..... hope I'm correct. Now, if I connect 18650 batteries after it, the voltage of the battery might not be able to power the circuit
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
17,161
hi Ifeco,
If its a transformer less rectifier, looking at the photos, I would not attempt to add a battery to that unit.

Are you trying to power USB devices in some way.??

E

It looks like a mains switching power supply, I would recommend not to make any modifications.
 

kubeek

Joined Sep 20, 2005
5,776
Hi Eric! Good job you are doing.... but this component is positioned at the AC input just after a fuse and a capacitor ....I think is a transformerless rectifier..... hope I'm correct. Now, if I connect 18650 batteries after it, the voltage of the battery might not be able to power the circuit
Definitely not. That rectifier is on the 230Vac side, and the rectified DC after that bridge will be around 325V. Therefore you would need about 77 fully charged lithium cells connected in series to get the correct voltage.
 

Thread Starter

Ifeco

Joined Jul 29, 2018
6
Definitely not. That rectifier is on the 230Vac side, and the rectified DC after that bridge will be around 325V. Therefore you would need about 77 fully charged lithium cells connected in series to get the correct voltage.


Hi kubeek! U hit the point. That component is rectifying an 230v AC without a step down transformer........so since it is a 6x usb output device there must be a point along the circuitry, where I can connect some 18650 batteries to power the device when main fails....... I really help
 
Top