what will happen if square waveform is given to transformer primary side supply voltage?

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kittoo

Joined Jul 11, 2016
27
Dear sir/madam
what will happen if square waveform is given to transformer primary side supply voltage?
For high switching frequency ( 50-100 Khz Approx )
 

dannyf

Joined Sep 13, 2015
2,197
Transformers are essentially inductors whose impedance goes up with frequency.

A square wave is a combination of sine waves of various frequencies.

So the transformer will resist those high frequency signals more. Than it does the low frequency signals.

With some reasonable values, it is no different than passing a sine wave through it.

Thee flip side can be true: for low enough of an inductance value, or low frequency signals, the transformer can appear to be just a wire and saturate.

Without some numbers, it is hard. To say what will happen in your case.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,362
It was done using DC some time ago to produce AC in car radios called a vibrator, also synchronous ones used that did not require a rectifier.
Google should show it.
Max.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
27,424
The leakage inductance and eddy current loss of a low frequency power transformer will generally roll-off such a high frequency, but you may see a small, rounded off signal at the output.

A high frequency transformer carefully wound to give low leakage inductance on a low eddy current loss core such as ferrite or powdered iron can pass a 100kHz square-wave with low distortion.
But the square-wave must have equal plus and minus voltage to avoid any DC component in the signal.
 
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