What sensor use to measure fluid viscosity?

Thread Starter

MERYAM

Joined Sep 30, 2019
1
Hi,

firstly, thanks a lot to read this.

My answer is quickly an perhaps easy for you. I would like to know what sensor is used to measure no newtonian fluid´s viscosity.

Thanks a lot
 

recklessrog

Joined May 23, 2013
988
I remember a factory near where I worked had to mix some oil based liquids to a specific viscosity at a set temperature. The device they used was basically a D.C motor driving a hydraulic pump that forced the mixture which had been heated in a resevoir, through a calibrated orifice, and by monitoring the current drawn by the motor, they could measure the viscosity. If the liquid was too thin, the current was low, and if too thick, then the current was too high.
The machine had an analogue meter that simply indicated fail or pass. Low current and high current levels were painted red, center "pass" was coloured green.
The operators were not highly skilled, but this apparatus worked well enough to enable consistent results to be obtained
 

atferrari

Joined Jan 6, 2004
3,446
I somewhat recall the original idea (Saybolt Furol). Measured the time it took a sample of 60 ml to drop somewhere through a calibrated "pipe". Used for fuel oil amongst many.

Obviously not for continuous measurements.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
4,501
Hi,

firstly, thanks a lot to read this.

My answer is quickly an perhaps easy for you. I would like to know what sensor is used to measure no newtonian fluid´s viscosity.

Thanks a lot
I assume a Non-Newtonian fluid is what you are getting at? The facility I worked i9n we used Zahn Cups with known orifice holes and reference charts. Run a sample using a stop watch to time it. Here in the US we bought pretty much everything for viscosity work from Cole Parmer
Viscometers. The simple zahn cup is the least expensive combined with a stop watch but depending on what you need things can get pricey. Most of our applications were measuring varnish viscosity used for motor winding impregnation process. Additionally the fluid temperature needs known so a good digital thermometer is needed with the zahn cup method.

Ron

.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,860
Measuring viscosity is always a challenge, and because it is a resistance to flow it can't be measured i a non-flowing condition. So always there must be an indirect means to measure it, along with a means to create some sort of flow motion. The present postings show that there are many ways to measure viscosity and all of them relate to flow motion of some kind. So there really is not some sensor to measure viscosity directly. There are methods to determine the viscosity of a specific fluid whose properties are known and understood, but that is not actually measuring viscosity.

An example would be chicken fat, where the viscosity is directly related to temperature, so that measuring the temperature will allow a fairly accurate knowledge of the viscosity. But that relationship is different from the relationship of bacon grease to temperature.
 
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