What is meaning of hacking for you?

Thread Starter

Parth786

Joined Jun 19, 2017
642
Hi all

This is little bit weird question, After hearing the word hacking the first thing in mind it Comes is a crime. People's think hackers are a thief they hack they system and steal the data etc. But i do not think so I think If you have skill, then you can use it in a good or bad thing. That is depend upon on your thinking. For example if you know kung fu, Karate, then you can use it to save somebody's life or You can kill somebody It's all depend on the thinking of person.

I am curious to know how we can make a future in the field of hacking. If we want to learn hacking then how to do practice.

Note :This topics is very interesting for me and I did not stop myself from asking here I am busy to learn embedded system and programming. I am working to improve my knowledge on embedded system. I thought that I should take rest a for sometime that's why I asked this question here.

My request to you is that do not think that I am leaving embedded system and going to learn hacking. I am asking this question for general knowledge. I am aware that making good in hacking need experience and lot of practice in programming I know I do not have much experience about it. I just want to know if someone want to make career in hacking then what's skill require and how can he do practice to learn.
 

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,419
For me, hacking = re-purposing.
And not only for 'software' , but for equipment in general, not only computing. Can be for hydraulics, mechanics, ...and all the rest.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,579
Hacking with malicious intent was called 'Cracking' before the word 'hack' was abused by the media and general public as bad. A hack as a 'work' can be good, bad or Afro Engineering of the highest order but it must effective.
 

strantor

Joined Oct 3, 2010
5,177
Hacking to me used to mean the media definition, which is a crime involving defeating computer security. But now it means to me the real definition, which is modifying anything (esp. Hardware) to soothe a new purpose that it was not intended for
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,124
For me "hacking" is not a pejorative term. Yeah, hackers can do bad things with their tools just as people with guns can do bad things. That says nothing about the good people with the tools.

Hacking is what MacGyver does. It's taking all available resources and using them, particularly in unintended ways, to execute a goal. You can't really hack lumber to make furniture because that's more-or-less an intended use. Making furniture from an old tire might be called hacking.

I don't think you can really learn hacking, although I guess you can get better by challenging yourself and practicing. In my experience there are just some people that think this way and many more that just don't. Creative problem solving is not part of "common sense".
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
24,970
I am curious to know how we can make a future in the field of hacking. If we want to learn hacking then how to do practice.
Largely the same way you would learn to "hack" together mechanical systems to do something other than intended or anything else. First you need to learn how those systems do what they are intended to do, at least at the level you intend to work with them. Then you start digging in an modifying them. Expect a lot of failures along the way -- the goal is to learn something from everything you do.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
24,970
Hacking with malicious intent was called 'Cracking' before the word 'hack' was abused by the media and general public as bad. A hack as a 'work' can be good, bad or Afro Engineering of the highest order but it must effective.
My understanding is that it was very much the other way around. The term "hacker" was first applied to tinkering and modifying computer-based systems as a natural outgrown of the use of the same term for similar meaning in many other fields for decades prior. Farmers were notorious for hacking together solutions to immediate problems using whatever was at hand, often literally involving significant amounts of bailing wire.

It's my understanding that the term applied to computers was first used at MIT by members of one of the AI labs at MIT who borrowed it from its common usage in the Model Rail Road Club, which shared a lot of members.

It then started getting the bad connotation in the media because they echoed the term's usage by the members of the computer community when writing articles about hackers that did bad things. Since these were, pretty naturally, about the only time that the wider public heard the term "hacker" associated with computers, they naturally associated it with the intent of the actions and not the actions themselves -- the bad guy wasn't hacking a system to do something bad, the bad thing he was doing was hacking the system.

So After the word became "abused" in the media and general public, several attempts were made to find a different word to use in its place. The term "cracker" is one such attempt. But none of these efforts have been very successful because the basic problem still exists -- the general public perceives little value in distinguishing between these terms because they still largely only see whatever term used in the negative context and so, for them, they are more than happy to stick with the term they already know and the media (both news and entertainment) see know reason not to use the word that the mainstream public is already happy to stick with.

I think the most likely to succeed distinction is going to be "white hat hacker" and "black hat hacker", if only because it relies on another stereotype that the general public is already happy to accept -- you almost never need to explain what you mean when you use the term "white hat" and "black hat", even in a context that the other person is completely unfamiliar with.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
24,970
Hacking is what MacGyver does. It's taking all available resources and using them, particularly in unintended ways, to execute a goal.
I never saw anything comparable between hacking and what MacGyver did. I always associated hacking with using resources in unintended ways to actually accomplish some goal. I've never associated it with fanciful, harebrained contrivances that can only work in a make-believe world by violating the laws of physics. I don't see MacGyver's "hacking" any closer to real hacking than any of Yogi Bear's picnic basket stealing machines or the Cat-in-the-Hat's Thingamajigger.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,579
Computer cracking has the same origin as safe cracking or secret code cracking-breaking (cracked the German Enigma code). IMO the usage predates 'Hackers'. Hacks or cracks were techniques (hardware or programming) that were used by crackers to get into devices or systems. If a cryptographic system was compromised the term 'broke(n)' was used. ie...Breaking the German ENIGMA and Japanese PURPLE.

Cracks of US crypto/computer systems by Soviet operators/crackers.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1989/01/22/code-name-catastrophe/ee41ceb7-b9c5-4788-801e-1710db008098/?utm_term=.49f2636fb065
These two code machines were not compromised by the so-called "brute-force" method, which entails having supercomputers run through every possible keylist combination. Rather, the Soviets apparently had so much material -- including the KW-7 hardware, keylists and plain-text versions of messages sent on the system -- that they were able to exploit "design flaws" in the KW-7's logic that allowed them to do what the NSA had once believed impossible -- "break" the machine's code formula without use of the daily keylist. "The Soviets have always been reputed to be rather good in code breaking," says David Kahn, author of "The Codebreakers." "It's known that three things seem to be associated with success in code-breaking: musicianship, chess and mathematics. What are the three things the Russians are best at?" Collectively, Walker and Whitworth supplied some six virtually continuous years of keylists for the KW-7 and KWR-37. Walker says he also provided the Soviets the technical manuals, complete with the precise schematics of the design logic, for the KW-7 and the KWR-37 systems. All subsequent KW-7 and KWR-37 equipment modifications were provided by Whitworth, both spies now confirm. The Soviets had also obtained actual working versions of these machines. The United States lost both KW-7 and KWR-37 machines in January 1968, when North Korean gunboats seized the U.S. spy ship USS Pueblo for allegedly violating their territorial waters, and at least one other KW-7 was lost in Vietnam in the early 1970s, according to court testimony and Navy documents.
 
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