What are the available MCU Programming Frameworks which does not require bit-wise coding e.g. similar to MRDS-MVPL

Thread Starter

mack38

Joined Nov 29, 2019
21
When I was in Academics/collage in 2007, I still remember Microsoft at that time has a framework used to code MCU using C or C# code, it was very easy to understand and write but I believe that framework was bounded/limited to a particular MCU and also board considering that it was not a flexible option in other areas of applications.

To explain further my point I am just writing some code which may be wrong :

to control the speed of a motor there was a simple function --
<motor.h>
m_speed (200) or motor_speed(200, 2)

to rotate the armature/actuator at a particular angle of 60 degrees horizontally with particular speed --
armature(200, 60, h) or a_direction (60, 200), or arm_move(200, 60)

The point is there was no bit-wise coding, which reduces the boring and complicacy of code thereby increase the productivity of development in less time.
even a person from a simple programming knowledge can write a code for an embedded system.

I believe that tool has evolved and now Microsoft has added lots of visual drag and drops Activities for different/electronic components (e.g. sensors) in Microsoft visual programming language /MRSD (Microsoft Robotics Developer Studio).

My question is :-
What are the Popular MCU Programming frameworks (just like MVPL-MRDS) which use lots of pre-built functions which we can use while writing the code for MCU and also these frameworks are used by big MNCs so that after learning them I will get a Job?
E.g. my targeted industries are the Automobile industry, Home appliances, Printers, Automatic industrial machinery, CNC, Avionic industry etc...

I know some of the people will discourage me to use these frameworks due to the non-visibility of operations happening at bit-level but still I want to know. (but then I suppose there would be also a good debugger just like Microsoft Visual Simulation Environment).

I don't know currently MRDS supports ARM-based MCU and big companies are using this or not? and it is free for commercial use or companies have other better options ?.

Apart from the main question I also want to know if there is any other demanding tool (because it is a paid tool (no free installer) and so very few people know how to use that tool so it is demanding).
I want to know these things so that I can start learning those frameworks used by big companies (e.g. in Automobiles, Automatic industrial machinery).
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
19,930
This is the modern times not like in 1970 when we programmed computers in 0s and 1s.
Every MCU manufacturer will suggest IDE platforms for their products.

If you want to get your feet wet you can try Arduino though it would not be my choice for professional engineering applications.
 

Analog Ground

Joined Apr 24, 2019
278
To add to MrChips, a manufacturers IDE (Integrated Development Environment) will include "configuration tools" and libraries for internal peripheral modules (GPIO, A/D, Timers, Clock generators, etc.) which provide functions which do a lot of the low level, bit operations you are trying to avoid. The problem with these tools is the programmer is severely handicapped when debugging something that doesn't work. I am not a big fan but I concede they have their place. There are some of us which actually enjoy programming at a low level and knowing how something works. I think this skill is particularly important in the industries you cite. You may want to update your knowledge of current embedded development tools and practices as MrChips suggests.
 

Thread Starter

mack38

Joined Nov 29, 2019
21
To add to MrChips, a manufacturers IDE (Integrated Development Environment) will include "configuration tools" and libraries for internal peripheral modules (GPIO, A/D, Timers, Clock generators, etc.) which provide functions which do a lot of the low level, bit operations you are trying to avoid. The problem with these tools is the programmer is severely handicapped when debugging something that doesn't work. I am not a big fan but I concede they have their place. There are some of us which actually enjoy programming at a low level and knowing how something works. I think this skill is particularly important in the industries you cite. You may want to update your knowledge of current embedded development tools and practices as MrChips suggests.
So, can you please tell me what are the names of popular MCU used by Toyota, Volkswagen, GM, Honda, BMW, Audi, Jaguar and Caterpillar, ABB Group, Deere & Co, CNH Industrial NV, Linde AG so that I can learn them and try a job at these companies.
The second thing I want to know what are the paid software tools of which Free trial is not available and these companies use them so that I can learn them and try a job at these companies. (as they are not nagware for them which also means there will be fewer people knowing them and so dependency on those candidates who know them.)

I also want to know what are the manufacturing business options for a person having Computer Science and Electronic background.
 

Analog Ground

Joined Apr 24, 2019
278
So, can you please tell me what are the names of popular MCU used by Toyota, Volkswagen, GM, Honda, BMW, Audi, Jaguar and Caterpillar, ABB Group, Deere & Co, CNH Industrial NV, Linde AG so that I can learn them and try a job at these companies.
The second thing I want to know what are the paid software tools of which Free trial is not available and these companies use them so that I can learn them and try a job at these companies. (as they are not nagware for them which also means there will be fewer people knowing them and so dependency on those candidates who know them.)

I also want to know what are the manufacturing business options for a person having Computer Science and Electronic background.
1. Google is your friend: Top MCU IC Suppliers.
2. The tools from these manufacturers are not "free trials" or "nagware". The tools are simply "free". There are "paid" development systems but I do not use them. Perhaps someone else can help you. One idea is to check out the "Partner" information for the top MCU companies. For example, here is the "NXP Partner" page (the top company on the list above). IMHO, I would think the size of the development teams at any of these manufacturers is way bigger than any companies making "paid" tools. If I was making billions of dollars of MCUs, I would not rely on some independent software company for such a critical component of my business. IMHO.
3. "manufacturing business options" are found on career web pages. IMHO, the way into the top tier manufacturing companies you list is through internships and they recruit at major universities.
 

Thread Starter

mack38

Joined Nov 29, 2019
21
1. Google is your friend: Top MCU IC Suppliers.
2. The tools from these manufacturers are not "free trials" or "nagware". The tools are simply "free". There are "paid" development systems but I do not use them. Perhaps someone else can help you. One idea is to check out the "Partner" information for the top MCU companies. For example, here is the "NXP Partner" page (the top company on the list above). IMHO, I would think the size of the development teams at any of these manufacturers is way bigger than any companies making "paid" tools. If I was making billions of dollars of MCUs, I would not rely on some independent software company for such a critical component of my business. IMHO.
3. "manufacturing business options" are found on career web pages. IMHO, the way into the top tier manufacturing companies you list is through internships and they recruit at major universities.
Thanks, Analog Ground, for the most appropriate and satisfactory reply, it really helped me out in taking a decision. :) you have given the best reply but still, I am looking if others can put some more light on "business options in the area of electronic industries" as I want to start a business, I posted a similar question at Here with more detail giving/showing some example thereby expressing my area of interest. Once again thanks for your reply in case if you get chance to look my other thread then I would be thankful to you :)
 

BobaMosfet

Joined Jul 1, 2009
941
So, can you please tell me what are the names of popular MCU used by Toyota, Volkswagen, GM, Honda, BMW, Audi, Jaguar and Caterpillar, ABB Group, Deere & Co, CNH Industrial NV, Linde AG
I know that Atmel (owned by Microchip now, I believe) is one of the most ubiquitous.
 

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
3,793
Many vendors recent times have added to their proprietary lines ARM based cores.

One unusual vendor is Cypress and their PSOC. This is ARM core + analog + logic fabric + DSP +
routable. A family of parts bridging several technologies all in one part.

Chips have a catalog of components, a component in PSOC is an onchip resource. Attached is
a catalog of components for the 5LP family. Additionally the user community is offering
custom components for addition to the onchip libraries for use. like DDS, MAC, 74 MSI logic
type parts.........

Families from low end PSOC 4, to dual core high end PSOC 6 for BT and other applications.

IDE (PSOC Creator) and compiler free.

Here is an example DSP design, most of the chips resources were not used, available for other
design needs.

1581605000721.png


Again, one chip, many resources left, see right hand window of used/left.


Regards, Dana.
 

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