Voltage, Resistance and Current

Thread Starter

ben sorenson

Joined Feb 28, 2022
82
If there was a DC circuit powered by a battery that outputs 2ah being switched on/off at 1khz consisting of a loop of wire with a resistance of 50 ohms yielding 2500 dc volts and dissipating through a resistor of 1 Ohm wouldn't that mean the current of the circuit would be 49 Amps because according to ohms law current is resistance/ voltage and if the battery can only output a max of 20 amps would that mean energy is being generated? I'm confused.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
30,774
Sorry but your description makes little sense.
Please post a diagram of what you are referring.

And saying the battery has a 2ah capacity doesn't tell me the battery voltage.
 
Last edited:

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
5,748
1. The Ah rating says nothing about how much current a battery will deliver.

2. A loop of of wire with a changing voltage is not a resistor, it is an inductor with series resistance.

3. Where in the hell did the 2500V come from?
 

wraujr

Joined Jun 28, 2022
40
Not steady state DC analysis, appears to be some type of voltage step-up (i.e. wire-loop and 1kHz freq)...
Is this about high voltage generation for spark plugs in a car?
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
30,774
I think I know ohms law.. or a basic part of it. Dosent it state the current in a circuit is the equivalent to the voltage of the circuit divided by its resistance?
Basically.
But that doesn't really help answering your question without seeing the circuit diagram.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,552
The voltage and current in the circuit can never be greater than the power that the battery can deliver considering it's own ESR (Equivalent Series Resistance) and the ability for the battery to convert the chemical energy it stores into electrical energy.

There will always be losses, not gains.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
27,391
I think I know ohms law.. or a basic part of it. Dosent it state the current in a circuit is the equivalent to the voltage of the circuit divided by its resistance?
No. It says that the current through THAT resistor is equal to the voltage across THAT resistor divided by THAT resistance.

It seems that you are making one of the classic mistakes and just grabbing random voltages and currents and resistances and throwing them at a formula.

Please draw your circuit and annotate the voltages and currents you are referring to. That will go a long way in helping to put everyone on the same page.
 

Thread Starter

ben sorenson

Joined Feb 28, 2022
82
Basically.
But that doesn't really help answering your question without seeing the circuit diagram.
No. It says that the current through THAT resistor is equal to the voltage across THAT resistor divided by THAT resistance.

It seems that you are making one of the classic mistakes and just grabbing random voltages and currents and resistances and throwing them at a formula.

Please draw your circuit and annotate the voltages and currents you are referring to. That will go a long way in helping to put everyone on the same page.
Im sorry, OK. I will try to be more clear when I post things.
 
Top