vintage record player

Thread Starter

tsarbo

Joined Dec 21, 2023
8
Hello, I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question as I do not know hardley anything about electronics but I have an old record player that plays but has minimal volume. I have taken it apart and I think this could be the problem(see photo), can anyone tell me if and where I could buy a replacement and what would I ask for.
 

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LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
4,052
Old, cheap Tube-Amplifiers virtually always have "leaky" Capacitors.
All of the Capacitors, with the possible exception of most "Mica" type Capacitors, will need replacement.

The first thing to do is to spend ~2 to ~5 hours gathering any information that You can find
on your particular Model and Manufacturer,
especially to obtain a Wiring-Schematic,
which will hopefully contain values for all the Components.
You may be able to decipher the Component-Values directly from the Components,
but sometimes the markings may be obscured.

""Usually"", new Capacitors will be all that You need,
but occasionally, these leaky Capacitors can burn-up other Components.
If that turns out to be just a Resistor, then you're in luck,
but, Leaky-Capacitors can also destroy Tubes and Transformers,
which can be substantially more expensive, and more difficult to obtain.

Someone who is very familiar with Tube-Amps can
probably make it work even without known Component-values,
but it's best to have an original Schematic to go by.
There might even be a Schematic glued to the inside of the Cabinet.
.
.
.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,779
Welcome to AAC!

Low volume has more to do with the amplifier than with the vinyl record player itself.
Start off any inquiry with the make and model of the unit. Then we can search for drawings and schematics.

Yes, those resistors appear to be over heated and broken, but we don't know from what part of the circuit they belong.
Show us more photographs, including the overall unit, faceplate, backplate, electronics, wiring, etc.
 

Thread Starter

tsarbo

Joined Dec 21, 2023
8
Welcome to AAC!

Low volume has more to do with the amplifier than with the vinyl record player itself.
Start off any inquiry with the make and model of the unit. Then we can search for drawings and schematics.

Yes, those resistors appear to be over heated and broken, but we don't know from what part of the circuit they belong.
Show us more photographs, including the overall unit, faceplate, backplate, electronics, wiring, etc.
Thank you, you are correct one of the resistors is broken, I did solder it back together but when I switched the player on the resistor overheated which I assume is why it was broken in the first place, there isn't any model or serial numbers but just the label on the front ALBA. I've attached a few more photos
 

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Dodgydave

Joined Jun 22, 2012
11,299
Looks like an Alba 209 vintage type with tone control,this is the nearest circuit to it. Sorry about the quality of the image it was downloaded. I think the broken resistors are R4 180 ohms (390 ohms in parallel )to the rectifier valve V1.

alba_212_record_player_723322.png
 
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MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,779
Trace the wires leading from the V1 socket and tell us the colour of the wire and to where it leads. The V1 socket pins are numbered 1 to 9 going clockwise while looking from the bottom.

1703190233814.png


1703190071973.png
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,779
Ok. I am going to assume that someone had worked on this before and had already tried to replace R4, 180Ω, unknown wattage.
I would try to replace R4 with 180Ω (5W minumum) resistor.
 

Thread Starter

tsarbo

Joined Dec 21, 2023
8
Ok. I am going to assume that someone had worked on this before and and already tried to replace R4, 180Ω, unknown wattage.
I would try to replace R4 with 180Ω (5W minumum) resistor.
Number 4 wire is black and goes to number 5 on the other valve and number 5 is white and goes to the turntable transformer.
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
3,088
The component most likely to fail over time and cause too much current to flow through the two parallel resistors is the dual 32uF electrolytic capacitor, C2a and C2b in the first schematic and C3a and C3b in the last schematic.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,779
Hello, I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question as I do not know hardley anything about electronics…
As a language coach, I just noticed your opening remark. In case you need help with the English language, what you wrote says that you know a lot about electronics. You meant to say,
“I know hardly anything about electronics”.
Like logic, two negatives make a positive. Also note the spelling of “hardly”.
 

Thread Starter

tsarbo

Joined Dec 21, 2023
8
As a language coach, I just noticed your opening remark. In case you need help with the English language, what you wrote says that you know a lot about electronics. You meant to say,
“I know hardly anything about electronics”.
Like logic, two negatives make a positive. Also note the spelling of “hardly”.
Thank you for the grammar check, I should know better than using a double negative and I will make sure I check my spelling in future. I will do better next time. Have a positively festive Christmas.
 
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