Vibration isolation for PCB

Thread Starter

matheus_ronconi44

Joined Aug 4, 2020
4
Hi everyone.

I'm new at the forum and i hope to learn more about PCB manufacturing and general electronics.
Heres my question: I'm working with the development of an single flow water valve, using a wash-machine electric solenoide
to control the water flow.
I'm willing to attach my valve on my PCB, but i'm wondering if the 24/7 vibration of the internal motor of the valve
can make some kind of damage to the PCB.
In the same board i have the control system and a micro controler, so i'm wondering if this constant vibration can make some damage on my board. I have plenty of clean space on my board, but the vibration realy makes me wondering about the durability of my project.
Have anyone work with some kind of vibration isolation on pcb? Attach my valve on the board is a bad idea?
Sorry for my bad english, i'm not a native speaker.

Thanks!
 

Thread Starter

matheus_ronconi44

Joined Aug 4, 2020
4
Hey jpanhalt! Thanks for your help!

As i say, my valve will be atteched by 4 screw's on my board. I'm going to use it on a Drone application that is already been running. The water valve will be controlled by the control system on the same board.

I look for some similar content but no luck until now. Someone have some similar kind of protection before?
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,078
Washing machines, avionics, cameras on drones, stuff in space, radios in cars, electric guitars etc. are all subject to vibration and survive. If the PCB flexes and has SMD components, they can easily be damaged.

It's a question of how much and what type of vibration and design of the PCB. Small rubber grommets might be enough to isolate the water valve, if anything is needed at all.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,194
A solenoid valve does not have a motor in the accepted sense, if no vibration is required, a DC version is more acceptable and vibration resistant.
Max.
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
527
PCB's suffer cracked tracks if they bend, assuming the PCB is fixed well, then your fine ,
Sort of things that causes problems is a long thin PCB, some screws at the end, and the middle of the PCB bounces as the tub moves.

The other thing to check is component mounting, Again if the board vibrates, then something like a tall capacitor is also vibrating, and like all metals, if you flex them forward and back they will eventually break Hot glue is your friend, but makes fixing a fault "interesting".

If the PCB can get damp, even if its from condensation, its good practise to spray it in conformal coating, again once sprayed, it makes modifying more difficult.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,078
Hot glue is your friend, but makes fixing a fault "interesting".
There's an easy way to remove hot glue. My T-962 reflow oven had it on everything -- like frosting on a cake. A drop or two of 99% isopropyl alcohol made it come loose and peel off in virtually one piece. Great "mold" release. It does not noticeably dissolve the hot glue either, which would be messy if it did. It evaporated with no residue.

I was surprised at low easy it was to clean up. I didn't try 70%, as I only have 99%.
 

Thread Starter

matheus_ronconi44

Joined Aug 4, 2020
4
What is the control system consist of?
Max.
Thanks for your previous help!

It's an arduino uno, already have the code but the vibration issue keep me away from the final test. It may be a misjudge of my perspective, cause the drone already have an constant turbulance vibration. My main issue is about the proximity of the valve to the pcb, causa i want to make it on one piece.
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
527
Unos are quiet mechanically tough,
though quiet big,
there are smaller Arduinos such as the Teensey
https://www.pjrc.com/teensy/

The arduino Uno is about the same as the Teensey 2

but 1/4 the size, and smaller size makes things stiffer, and thus more suited for your job.
 
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