Trouble calculating voltage

Thread Starter

Fnordgasm5

Joined Mar 2, 2013
5
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Above is the circuit from one of my assignments. I am asked to calculate the current through the load first using superposition and again using Thevenin's theorem.

Using superposition is not a problem. My issue is calculating the equivelent Thevenin's voltage for the circuit. Specifically I am having a hard time conceptualising what is happening at the dot between the two inductors when the load is removed. Is the voltage the sum of the two voltages entering the node or am I subtracting the two? I seem to have arrived at a value of 586.9V at an angle of 135 degrees but for the love of god I could not tell you how I managed that.

Any help please?
 

Jony130

Joined Feb 17, 2009
5,155
What if you replace the inductors in a circuit and use resistors instead. Are you now able to solve for the voltage at the "middle" point?
 

Thread Starter

Fnordgasm5

Joined Mar 2, 2013
5
What if you replace the inductors in a circuit and use resistors instead. Are you now able to solve for the voltage at the "middle" point?
Not really. The math gets simpler but the math isn't really the problem I am having. The way I see it is there are 6 voltages in play. There's the two supply voltages, the two voltage drops going left to right, and the two voltage drops going right to left, and the middle point is some kind of sum of these voltages. It is what that combination is and why that is the problem I'm having. It is that concept I am having trouble with.
 

Jony130

Joined Feb 17, 2009
5,155
But do you see that only one current is flowing in the circuit? And you can always use a KVL around the loop. At it will work no matter in which direction you do the loop.

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