Tire Leaks.

Thread Starter

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
28,512
For some years now I have used the method of sealing annoying leaks in tubeless tires, which is e a common occurrence here during sub zero temps, by running a 3/4 cup of neat anitfreeze through the valve stem.
Anyone else use this method, I cannot come across it out there on the web, which I thought it would have been seen, either pro or con.
Max.
 

dannyf

Joined Sep 13, 2015
2,197
They sell those green slimmy tire repair stuff for that. Never a long term solution.

Given how important tires are to the safety of vehicle occupants, Im surprised that how little attention and care people put on tires.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,493
The Slime works great but can/will ruin the TPMS sensors, so it's not much use in cars made (in the U.S.) since 2007. Even my 2002 has a TPMS. The Fix-a-Flat type products have the same problem.

I'd be concerned about this problem with ethylene glycol, which I've never heard of being used in a tire. But maybe since it won't adhere and flows away, it doesn't bother the sensors? No idea.

I though I've heard that standing in a puddle of antifreeze was considered bad for your tires. Old wives tale?
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,009
The Slime works great but can/will ruin the TPMS sensors, so it's not much use in cars made (in the U.S.) since 2007. Even my 2002 has a TPMS. The Fix-a-Flat type products have the same problem.

I'd be concerned about this problem with ethylene glycol, which I've never heard of being used in a tire. But maybe since it won't adhere and flows away, it doesn't bother the sensors? No idea.

I though I've heard that standing in a puddle of antifreeze was considered bad for your tires. Old wives tale?
It is bad. Tire rubber is filled with so many additives that any solvent can extract them and reduce tire performance or life. You'll usually see a "bloom" where the solvent effected the tire and extracted or swelled into the rubber. Even parking on wet/decomposing grass repeatedly can age a tire. Addives prevent air and ozone oxidation, cracking (dry rot) and improve traction and cold weather performance (keep tires flexible).
 

ClassOfZero

Joined Dec 28, 2016
114
Wanna swap we've got 40'C here today, weatherman reckons it'll top 47 by Friday.


Sorry my bad it 17:35 and it's gone up another degree or 2 at the weather station. Should be a nice chilly 30 - 35 tonight.
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
10,044
Just my observation on this. Never heard or thought of adding antifreeze to a tire. But if it works it's probably because it would lubricate the joint between the tire bead and rim. I think the reason there are more low tires in the winter than the summer is that when you hit a pothole the cold rubber can't reseal to the rim as fast as it would/does in the heat of summer. So a tiny bit of air escapes from the joint, and soon you have a low tire. The lubrication from the antifreeze would allow the tire/rim joint to slide and reseal faster.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
7,447
When it comes to tires I figure it this way, they are the only thing between my butt and the road. I don't screw around and generally buy the best for my truck or my wife's truck. This has rubbed off on my kids which I see as a good thing.

As to winter tire pressure? I just maintain them. Matter of fact I just checked my truck tires as early morning I am driving Cleveland, Ohio down to Winston Salem NC (about 500 miles). Never heard of the antifreeze in the tires thing. Wondering how it would affect balance?

Ron
 

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
8,177
For some years now I have used the method of sealing annoying leaks in tubeless tires, which is e a common occurrence here during sub zero temps, by running a 3/4 cup of neat anitfreeze through the valve stem.
Anyone else use this method, I cannot come across it out there on the web, which I thought it would have been seen, either pro or con.
Max.
Never had that problem.. (of course)... but as a mechanical engineer, I'd feel inclined to use an oily or greasy substance for that. The goal being lubricating the tire's lips so that they kept full contact with the rim at all times, hence insuring proper sealing. But I'm guessing that at those temperatures, there's no oil or grease out there that could keep fluid enough to fulfill that purpose.... or is there?
Another option could be using a graphite-based grease, but it would have to be applied directly between the rim and the tire's lip...

Those are just ideas, of course, and I have no experience whatsoever with this sort of problem... just brainstorming here... Plus, one would have to consider the chemical consequences of any substance making contact with the tires, as Gopher has so clearly stated.
 

Thread Starter

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
28,512
My brother passed on the tip to me around 20yrs ago and we have used it effectively ever since.
Antifreeze does not affect rubber, think radiator hoses.
Also never experienced any out of balance problems.
The advantage is it can be applied in a few minutes through the valve stem.
Max.
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,009
Good point... are tires and hoses made of exactly the same material?
They are both made of rubber but that is like saying PVC pipe is the same material as a PVC beach ball. The monomers may be the same but the platicizers, the degree and type of cross-linking, anti-oxidant package, UV stabilizers, inorganic fillers, free volume, reinforcement chord material, ... Are not the same.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,493
It would be an impossible coincidence if tires and coolant hoses were made of the same material. Have you ever shopped for hose? The variety of chemistries out there is daunting.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,493
That's true, if you're talking about industrial hoses. But for automotive I'm guessing the universe is much more narrow.
Some, but there are hoses for fuel, coolant, air and vacuum, brake fluid, and so on. They're all different and it can be risky to substitute one for the other.
 

RichardO

Joined May 4, 2013
2,270
My brother got the tip from an old railroad engineer, AFAIK they have never used rubber tires on a Locomotive!:confused:
Max.
I was told that the railroads introduced goathead thorns to the western US for erosion control. Other accounts say it hitched-hiked on the railroad with the cargo. Either way, they never got flats -- I wish I could say the same for my bicycle.
 
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