Is this TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System) sensor board ruined?

Thread Starter

MontanaMan

Joined Nov 22, 2023
1
TPMS Sensors (in the wheels) batteries died. I removed the sensor and tried to replace the battery. The image below shows the circuit board. The two red arrows show where the coin battery tabs are supposed to be soldered in. I did a bad job trying to de-solder and clean up the battery mounting positions. You'll notice the metal piece has become unattached from the board, so I'm not sure if the board can be saved. Can anyone make some recommendations? Is the board ruined? Can it be fixed?

If it can be fixed, is there any way to test the board with a multi-meter after fixing it?

I'm off to learn de-soldering (more difficult than I thought), and will look for your responses.

Thanks!


SensorPic.jpg
 
Last edited:

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
8,973
Welcome to AAC.

Your photo is too poorly lit and out of focus to tell where the trace you pulled off connects. I suspect there is a trace touching the torn off square pad under the solder mask (green stuff).

In any case, if the lifted trace is the only damage you can certainly repair it. You will have to carefully scrape off the solder mask and then solder a wire between the battery contact and the scraped trace, then glue the wire down with CA, and maybe use (electronics grade) silicone or hot glue to anchor the battery contant.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
17,794
The lifted trace should be able to be glued back with super-glue, and then a thin piece of copper wire soldered across the joint.
And it seems that the TS, or whoever did the damage, has no clue as to how to solder and unsolder.
To learn that, start with working on a scrap printed circuit board from a failed electronic device. Learning on the most expensive item is a really poor choice. Soldering takes both practice and understanding, and a proper tool that is in adequate condition and hot enough.
But first, there is a need to understand how to do it from reading a book. Do not watch the fake cartoons on the internet, yoo toob or otherwise.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
8,973
The lifted trace should be able to be glued back with super-glue, and then a thin piece of copper wire soldered across the joint.
And it seems that the TS, or whoever did the damage, has no clue as to how to solder and unsolder.
To learn that, start with working on a scrap printed circuit board from a failed electronic device. Learning on the most expensive item is a really poor choice. Soldering takes both practice and understanding, and a proper tool that is in adequate condition and hot enough.
But first, there is a need to understand how to do it from reading a book. Do not watch the fake cartoons on the internet, yoo toob or otherwise.
Normally I would agree that either reusing the trace or using copper tape would be preferable. But taking into account the skill level and doing a little guessing at the available tools, a badge wire seems a better route.

And, importantly, if the trace is reused something must be done to ensure the mechanical integrity of the battery contacts mounting to the PCB and a CA-glued reused trace won’t do that. So, Silastic, hot glue, epoxy—something to keep that contact… in contact.
 

ThePanMan

Joined Mar 13, 2020
757
I've torn a TPMS apart before. They're equipped with a CR2450 coin cell battery. Trouble is once you've depotted it you can't use it again. Sure you can put a new battery in there - but it's a whole lot of trouble. And if it works then you've saved yourself over a hundred bucks (US). Using it for something else? I have a few old TPMS's and wouldn't mind any suggestions on how they might be used elsewhere. But since they interface via radio with the vehicle, getting them to communicate with something other than the vehicle will be a challenge.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
8,973
I've torn a TPMS apart before. They're equipped with a CR2450 coin cell battery. Trouble is once you've depotted it you can't use it again. Sure you can put a new battery in there - but it's a whole lot of trouble. And if it works then you've saved yourself over a hundred bucks (US). Using it for something else? I have a few old TPMS's and wouldn't mind any suggestions on how they might be used elsewhere. But since they interface via radio with the vehicle, getting them to communicate with something other than the vehicle will be a challenge.
You might be interested in this Andreas Spiess video:

 
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