The full wave rectifier circuit with capacitor to convert 220V AC to 300V DC.

Thread Starter

vngn10

Joined Jun 5, 2021
16
Hello everyone, this is my full wave rectifier circuit with capacitor to convert 220V AC to 300V DC.
I just wanna ask is it ok to use in the real life, and do I need to replace or delete some components?
Thank you for your response, your response really helps me a lot. Have a nice day!!
1638410844602.png
 
Last edited:

ronsimpson

Joined Oct 7, 2019
1,750
I removed the wire from V1 to "ground". I added the red "X".
Now V1 (power line) connects to D8&D9 and D11&D10 only.
D8&D11 go to C4 and D9&D10 to L1 ..... C3
1638413360118.png
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
28,474
What you have is a half-wave short circuit, not a full-wave rectifier. :eek:
If you connect V1 to ground, as you had, then D1 is shorted, and you will draw a short-circuit current through D8 when the top of V1 goes negative.

With a bridge rectifier circuit you can never connect the output common to the input source or you will let out the magic smoke.
 

Thread Starter

vngn10

Joined Jun 5, 2021
16
What you have is a half-wave short circuit, not a full-wave rectifier. :eek:
If you connect V1 to ground, as you had, then D1 is shorted, and you will draw a short-circuit current through D8 when the top of V1 goes negative.

With a bridge rectifier circuit you can never connect the output common to the input source or you will let out the magic smoke.
So I have rebuild the circuit like this. Is it okay now sir?Screenshot_20211202-120049_Messenger.jpg
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
8,135
Before digging deeper into this circuit, how do you plan to use it, and why the choke before the capacitor? Of particular interest is whether you intend the current from line to return though earth or neutral. The may be electrical codes to consider, and always safety to consider.
 

Thread Starter

vngn10

Joined Jun 5, 2021
16
Before digging deeper into this circuit, how do you plan to use it, and why the choke before the capacitor? Of particular interest is whether you intend the current from line to return though earth or neutral. The may be electrical codes to consider, and always safety to consider.
I decide to make the high frequency high voltage circuit. This one fullwave rectifier is a part of my circuit, I decide to use fullwave rectifier to convert 220V AC to 300V DC and then use the oscillating circuit to convert 300V DC again to AC and then use transformer to stepup high voltage. This is my plan to use
 

Thread Starter

vngn10

Joined Jun 5, 2021
16
Please Don't!

If you couldn't figure that something was wrong with the circuit you posted...you should NOT be messing with high voltage.
This is the topic my professor give to me :( I try to read the article, see others full wave circuit but I still struggle so that's why I'm here asking all of you sir!
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,583
I decide to make the high frequency high voltage circuit. This one fullwave rectifier is a part of my circuit, I decide to use fullwave rectifier to convert 220V AC to 300V DC and then use the oscillating circuit to convert 300V DC again to AC and then use transformer to stepup high voltage. This is my plan to use
Seems a bit counter-intuitive. Change AC to DC back to AC. If high voltage is the assignment then the appropriate transformer should be used. You're not going all that high, so why rectify then invert (oscillate)? Is 300 volts AC the goal? If so - find the right transformer and be done with the assignment.

And I feel it necessary to reiterate the dangers of messing with high voltages. If you think you are going to manage to be safe - just the other day I zapped myself with high voltage. I was using a bug zapper, a very small one, and accidentally touched the transformer leads. Yikes! Got a quick reminder of just how easy it is to touch the wrong thing. Fortunately for me it was a local zap in the palm of my hand. Not through the body. And I've been messing with this stuff for decades. We all make mistakes and we all manage to find a live wire from time to time. Just how high that voltage and current is - and exactly how we take that charge will make the difference between an accident and a fatal accident.

BE SAFE! HIGH VOLTAGE IS NO JOKE!
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
8,135
240 VAC is very painful and it can be fatal, so there it is not really worth it to expose yourself to it needlessly, and with a transformer, you won't be playing "tricks" like returning current from the power line through ground (something that can be dangerous and your circuit breaker might not even go along with).

I think Tonyr1084 has the right idea - start with a transformer to isolate your circuit from the AC line. That will make testing your circuit a lot easier, and maybe make us worry a little less.

Do you have a design for the high voltage oscillator part of the circuit? To what will it connect as a load?
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
10,465
If the input, either 220v in the UK or 240 v in the US, is a mains source then the output of the bridge circuit MUST NOT be grounded, as pats of the mains are very solidly grounded.
The reason to rectify and then use an inverter is that a high frequency transformer is much smaller, much lighter, and costs a lot less than a 50 or 60 Hz transformer with a similar power rating.
BUT the high voltage from that transformer will be at a much higher frequency, which is fine if the high voltage will be rectified, but useless if you are looking for a mains frequency output.
For a reference, check out the circuit for a Panasonic "Inverter" microwave oven. That heavy and expensive mains transformer has been replaced with a smaller and much lighter high frequency device that costs much less. The circuit is much more complex but the parts are not expensive.
 

Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
4,086
The reason to rectify and then use an inverter is that a high frequency transformer is much smaller, much lighter, and costs a lot less than a 50 or 60 Hz transformer with a similar power rating.
BUT the high voltage from that transformer will be at a much higher frequency, which is fine if the high voltage will be rectified, but useless if you are looking for a mains frequency output.
Many inverters modulate the rectified high frequency with 50Hz or 60Hz class-D amplifier so that the output is the low frequency sinewave.
 
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