Testing of ultrasonic killing of bacteria in/on skin by kHz-MHz sweep device.

Thread Starter

jaydb

Joined Jan 1, 2018
2
I'd like to explore the killing dynamics of ultrasound of pathogenic bacteria.
I am looking for help to design (and perhaps build) a device that can do a broad frequency and power sweep.
I am interested to test this device on a specific pathogen in vitro in my microbiology lab before considering clinical applications.
 

BR-549

Joined Sep 22, 2013
4,938
I hadn't heard that. What's it do.....make em dizzy? I have heard of ultra-violet sterilization.

Edit: I do remember reading about a plasma process....but can't recall the details.
 

Thread Starter

jaydb

Joined Jan 1, 2018
2
Literature on ultrasound to kill bacteria is scarce.
However, we use sonicators all the time to kill (lyse) bacteria by disrupting their membranes.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
22,101
Research has been conducted where biological cells have been modeled as tuned circuits.
At the resonant frequency, the cells absorb significant amount of energy and explode.

(Don't ask me for links to references because I haven't looked for any.)
 

Raymond Genovese

Joined Mar 5, 2016
1,658
I'd like to explore the killing dynamics of ultrasound of pathogenic bacteria.
I am looking for help to design (and perhaps build) a device that can do a broad frequency and power sweep.
I am interested to test this device on a specific pathogen in vitro in my microbiology lab before considering clinical applications.
A quick check of the literature indicates that there are several such examples, as you noted. I am happy that you seem to clearly understand that this is not a clinical procedure. Whenever I read a post like yours, I worry that someone will not use the appropriate care and responsible safety.

It seems to me that lysing cells with ultrasonics would not discriminate much between cells, so there are obvious concerns. You are considering exploring this in vitro - I get that.

I think that you know one way forward on this - see what other labs have used.

For example, here they used a lower power to increase bacterial growth (accelerating transport I guess) and appear to have used a commercial sonicator (Sonicor SC100 ultrasonic bath). There is quite a bit on the topic within the food safety area (e.g., review here)...and, of course, the news releases like this one.

As to the specifics of your question: what you want to do is complicated because you are simply stating "a broad frequency and power sweep". You probably need to think about refining this into some actual specifications and ask again. Also, state and consider the medium that you intend to use.

Short of using some distance measuring devices and piezo buzzers and the like, I personally do not have much experience with ultrasonics that would likely be of help, but I think if you can define the specifications a little better, you might get a better response.

Hope that helps.
 

Janis59

Joined Aug 21, 2017
1,232
RE:""killing dynamics of ultrasound of pathogenic bacteria""

Is this a school project?? Watch for to not kill Yourself! That is rather normal that USound 130-170 dB is felt just like with dizziness or headaches, whilst it is damn pressure on organs, probably causing body cells exploding together with bacillus, if any.
However, recommend to read about RIFE technology (shiver Google), however it is claimed to be anti-science it still damn good works as diagnostic tool as healing tool. There the vibes are created by electric pulses making muscles to do the job, until the cellular membranes got exploding (probably yes, or this is crap). At least if You look into RIFE frequency listing by the diagnoses, You see most bacillus ought to have a 0,5-5 kHz quazi resonances (the accuracy of that frequency list is another fog-tied question). And only few diseases demand sth like 10 kHz what still is rather far off the ultrasound.
 

philba

Joined Aug 17, 2017
960
I looked at the RIFE stuff. My bogometer pegged on this one. When they are extolling the virtues of it and selling a product, I get suspicious.

As to the experiment, a controlled study would be a worthwhile thing but I'm very skeptical that, even if effective, the power needed will limit it to pretty small volumes. Also, the hazardous side effects are a consideration - the US embassy people in Cuba can attest to that.This whole thing strikes as similar to UBeam, the ultrasonic recharging snake oil company. Probably possible but practicality is lacking. However, if you hurry up you can tailgate UBeam and lure in some delirious investors before they wake up with a hangover.
 
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