Taser Gun effect

Status
Not open for further replies.

Thread Starter

Autobike

Joined Feb 23, 2018
91
hello :) as we know the Taser Gun uses a very high voltage. but its current is very low. so it's not lethal and someone can be zapped easily using it.
i think the same thing happens when we are zapped by a faulty spark plug wire.
so to make a shock, is it necessary to have a very high voltage? can't we use low voltage and very high current to get the same effect? is there any special reason behind using a high voltage instead of a high current ? thank you :)
 

oz93666

Joined Sep 7, 2010
739
I guess the power of the shock felt by the person must be proportional to the current passing through them .... also how far that path is ...

I believe most deaths occur when electricity even with a voltage of 240 passes up through the feet and out the left hand (heart is on the left) .feet in water makes the resistance low so the current in the body is high ....

A tazer shock has an electrical path through the body of only a few cm , the prongs are cms apart, so little danger of sending the heart into spasms since the electricity is confined to a small area away from the heart ....

You cannot fix the current you want with the device , all you can do is select the voltage , and depending on the resistance of the path through the body , this will give the current.
 

Picbuster

Joined Dec 2, 2013
1,049
A few mA applied to a certain part of a body will kill.
A body consist out of 95% water containing salt, acid and other conducting chemicals.
Current applied to muscular tissue will make it contract. The brain will try to easy and an uncontrolled contract and release could appear depending on current interval and total duration.
The only isolation from the inner body is skin resistance ( current =voltage/ resistance)
Oops the dangerous part; skin resistance is not constant ( current is depending on transpiration, illness or wounds and part of the body)

However stay away of this type of electronic devices in wrong hands ===> deadly arms.

Nobody should display,inform or produce any technical information about things that's designed to harm or kill people.

Picbuster
 

Thread Starter

Autobike

Joined Feb 23, 2018
91
I guess the power of the shock felt by the person must be proportional to the current passing through them .... also how far that path is ...

I believe most deaths occur when electricity even with a voltage of 240 passes up through the feet and out the left hand (heart is on the left) .feet in water makes the resistance low so the current in the body is high ....

A tazer shock has an electrical path through the body of only a few cm , the prongs are cms apart, so little danger of sending the heart into spasms since the electricity is confined to a small area away from the heart ....

You cannot fix the current you want with the device , all you can do is select the voltage , and depending on the resistance of the path through the body , this will give the current.
thank you :)

A few mA applied to a certain part of a body will kill.
A body consist out of 95% water containing salt, acid and other conducting chemicals.
Current applied to muscular tissue will make it contract. The brain will try to easy and an uncontrolled contract and release could appear depending on current interval and total duration.
The only isolation from the inner body is skin resistance ( current =voltage/ resistance)
Oops the dangerous part; skin resistance is not constant ( current is depending on transpiration, illness or wounds and part of the body)
However stay away of this type of electronic devices in wrong hands ===> deadly arms.
Nobody should display,inform or produce any technical information about things that's designed to harm or kill people.
Picbuster
thank you :)
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
12,396
I used to work on 20V, 1000A DC power supplies and it was quite safe to touch the output because the 20V could not drive enough current through you to even be able to feel it, let alone get a shock.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,087
hello :) as we know the Taser Gun uses a very high voltage. but its current is very low. so it's not lethal and someone can be zapped easily using it.
This sort of occurs frequently and always causes me to wonder what the questioner has in mind. Are they excessively worried about an electrical shock just as some are worried about lead exposure, or are they planning to do experiments?

All electrical shocks are dangerous and should be avoided. Tasers can be lethal. That is well documents in the public record. They are less lethal than an officer's service weapon, but can still be lethal per se. If you intentionally shock someone, and they fall or reflexively hit their head and die, that is still murder (unintentional homicide). There are other idiosyncratic responses that may happen and result in injury or death. The vasovagal response is one (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/vasovagal-syncope/symptoms-causes/syc-20350527 ).

First, a little anatomy. Here is an X-ray of a normal person (source: radiopedia.org):
upload_2019-9-12_6-17-30.png

Note the heart. It is in the mediastinum ("middle chest")(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mediastinum). While it is deviated a bit and points to the left, it is quite low in the chest and not just on the left side. The body is a "bulk" conductor. You should consider any shock from above the heart to a contact below the heart or to the chest proper as potentially passing over the heart. Based on that theory, arm to leg (regardless of which arm and leg is involved) is probably a little more dangerous than arm to arm. As one of the references below points out, however, none of the data on electric shock to humans is corrected for incidence. Thus, for example, arm to arm shock may occur much more frequently that leg to leg shock, but only those shocks that cause death or serious injury get reported.

Here are two often cited reviews of electrical shock in humans:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2763825/
https://www.researchgate.net/public...ards_associated_with_exposure_to_low_voltages

Unfortunately, there is a lot of repeated information in those articles. Note in particular some of the extremely low voltages and currents (≤30V, <20 mA) that have been reported to cause death. Years ago, I found a report of welders in China who were electrocuted with less than 30V. As all articles stress, lethality of a shock depends on several factors.

Someone will probably comment that they routinely test batteries by shocking themselves between the electrodes. They haven't died, yet, so it must be safe. Right? Safe, maybe. Smart, no.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top