Synthesized neutral wiring

Thread Starter

xox

Joined Sep 8, 2017
495
A recent thread on fickle mains wiring got me wondering about something. Is it possible to "synthesize" a neutral wire, safely?

I put together a quick simulation just to try out a couple of different ideas. To keep things simple I used a 1:1 transformer on a 240V source.


mains.png

http://tinyurl.com/y2vjzhru

Both dividers seem to work. But is that really an accurate representation of how one might expect a real-world circuit to behave? It almost seems unrealistic for some reason.
 
Last edited:

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,284
Out of any experience I have had, but it looks like:
In Conventional, you can ground the neutral and get plenty of current for either pole at 120V.
In Resisitive, you can ground the neutral, but it cannot return much current from either pole.
In Capacitive, the impedance at 60 Hz of each capacitor is about 265 Ω. That may be asking a lot of them at 120V.
 

Thread Starter

xox

Joined Sep 8, 2017
495
Out of any experience I have had, but it looks like:
In Conventional, you can ground the neutral and get plenty of current for either pole at 120V.
In Resisitive, you can ground the neutral, but it cannot return much current from either pole.
In Capacitive, the impedance at 60 Hz of each capacitor is about 265 Ω. That may be asking a lot of them at 120V.
Thank you, so inductive systems really are more stable.
 

Stevepl11

Joined Jul 20, 2020
5
Out of any experience I have had, but it looks like:
In Conventional, you can ground the neutral and get plenty of current for either pole at 120V.
In Resisitive, you can ground the neutral, but it cannot return much current from either pole.
In Capacitive, the impedance at 60 Hz of each capacitor is about 265 Ω. That may be asking a lot of them at 120V.
"Missed it by that much" Maxwell Smart in Get Smart. only off by SIX orders of magnitude, well done
 
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