Surge Protection for 12v DC 5.5x2.1mm Barrel Connector

Thread Starter

wxman

Joined Oct 13, 2022
25
I have been looking at in-line outdoor surge protectors / lightning arresters for security cameras and such. I've found a bunch like these that are designed for either ethernet, coax or BNC for around the $10 price range:


eth.jpg

coax.jpg

bnc.jpg


But, I can't seem to find anything designed for the standard 5.5x2.1 DC Barrel that nearly all analog and non-POE digital cameras use:

dcbarrel.jpg

I realize you can put a standard AC Wall socket surge protector on the oppose end that's connected to main house power but not at this type of end that's directly plugged to the camera. To me, it seems kind of useless to have a protector on the BNC cable at the camera, if on the same cable pigtail you have an unprotected DC barrel cable that runs across the yard at the same length. I would think you would need to protect all of the cables plugged into the camera at/near the camera location?

Appreicate any help/advice you could give.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
3,939
Think of all of your wiring as being a huge Antenna.

All wiring must be in Shielded-Cabling.

The deeper under the ground that You bury it, the safer it will be.

Pulling all wiring in 1-inch EMT-Conduit that is buried at least a foot deep
will provide excellent protection for around ~5-years or more before it starts to rust-out.
( This scheme will not have acceptable life expectancy near Salt-Water environments ).
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Thread Starter

wxman

Joined Oct 13, 2022
25
Unfortunately, in my case, we're talking hundreds of feet. Getting that much conduit would actually cost way more than the item I'm trying to protect. Maybe a couple times more! So that's why I'm looking for an ultra cheap solution that may provide just a little added protection for an indirect strike. Connecting one of those in-line adapters above to a grounding rod seems ideal for my budget, but I don't know why I can't seem to find any designed for the standard DC barrel while it can easily be found for practically any other connection style.

I thought about just getting a POE injecter to converrt the barel connector to ethernet, add one of the POE protectors, then a POE splitter to convert back to the barrel connector....But after thinking a little more, not sure that would do any good considering I'm working with 12v and the POE protector is designed to allow 48 volts to pass through....A "light" surge to 48 volts would not be stopped by the POE protector, yet would be enough to destroy equipment designed for 12v.
 

Thread Starter

wxman

Joined Oct 13, 2022
25
You could perhaps make a BNC to barrel wire adapter.
How many do you need?
Only one device...So guess I would need 2 (1 to convert to BNC then 1 to convert back to barrel)...

Also, I did find this:

https://www.amazon.com/Protector-La...i-level-Protection-Transmission/dp/B07ZP34XV3

surge.jpg

I don't understand all the specs on it, but wondering if something like this would work if I cut the barrel off, strip a little of the wire ends and put those raw wires in the orange part?
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
3,939
"" STRIKE ""
Absolutely NOTHING will protect against a Lightening-Strike that hits
within approx. a ~25-foot radius of your device.

Have a replacement on hand,
that's the most practical and cheapest solution.
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Thread Starter

wxman

Joined Oct 13, 2022
25
"" STRIKE ""
Absolutely NOTHING will protect against a Lightening-Strike that hits
within approx. a ~25-foot radius of your device.

Have a replacement on hand,
that's the most practical and cheapest solution.
.
.
.
Definitely! I realize a direct strike would blow it all to the next county. I do have replacements on hand for such an occasion. But installation is a bit of a pain, so would prefer to avoid having to do that with every "minor" surge, if at all possible. If there's any chance that a ~$10 device could prevent that in a distant strike or even just a hardware-related surge (failed power supply, damaged equipment in the power company's power grid, etc.), then it would be worth it! Worst case, it doesn't work and I wasted $10. I'm willing to gamble it, but just a matter of finding 1. what's easiest to work with and 2. What would appear to be most effective on a 12v line.
 

Thread Starter

wxman

Joined Oct 13, 2022
25
Another option that came to mind (though not sure if it's a good idea or not) would be to run a standard 120v AC extension cord from the house to a junction box at the install site. Connect that to a 120VAC surge protector power strip inside the junction box, then plug my 120VAC to 12VDC plug into that power strip. Then only a couple feet of the DC power from the junction box to the device. In theory, seems it would work, though I'm not sure how a standard household power strip would hold up to outdoor humidity and temperature extremes. Junction box would protect from rain, but it's not temp/humidity controlled.
 
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