Superconductors

Discussion in 'General Science' started by Wendy, Sep 11, 2010.

  1. nsaspook

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    The slightly more than lay level quantum explanation of type I superconductivity is pretty simple. That's good because it's the only way I understand it.
    No collisions of charge carriers means no losses. The structure (altered by temperature combined with the internal lattice of the material) of the superconductor (clean superconducting simple metal) effectively creates a single-particle energy state in the entire mass of the superconductor by having a Coherence length (analogous to electron mean free path) for charge carriers that's smaller than the collision path/scattering time. The analogy at the quantum level is conductor slices of single thickness quantum particles (wave-functions) in the XY plane moving in the Z direction all in lock-step phase and frequency.
    Quantum coherence
     
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  2. WBahn

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    IIRC (it's been over a quarter century since I worked, as an undergrad, at NIST in the Superconductor and Magnetic Measurements Group) one way to view electron-pairing in Type I superconductors is that the so-called cooper pairs are created via phonon exchange. As a result, when one electron in the pair is "scattered" by some interaction the other electron in the pair, via phonon exchange, is scattered in exactly the opposite way. The result is that the pair, overall, is not affected.
     
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  3. Wendy

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  4. Wendy

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  5. Wendy

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  6. nsaspook

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  7. nsaspook

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  8. nsaspook

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    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1906.00708.pdf
    Only in one sample but certainly very interesting if it turns out to be correct.
     
  9. Wendy

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    While it isn't science I firmly believe their will be a room temp superconductor someday, as nothing in science forbids it.
     
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