Suggest me a good crimp tool

Thread Starter

ArakelTheDragon

Joined Nov 18, 2016
1,314
Hi guys!

I need a good tool to work with on RVs, minimum gauge 10AWG, but it should be good for up to 24 and down to 8. I know that the crimp tool's quality depends on the pressing force and the amoung of times you can use it.

Can someone suggest to me something good and cheap. I will use it for PCB connectors also.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,616
Your crimper will depend on what type of connections you're crimping. This one works OK for crimping terminals onto smaller wires, such as when wiring automotive plugs. I've used it for a ton of terminals around 20-ish ga:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006CR4VY6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

For barrel connectors and wire ends this one works well. Note that it didn't close tight enough for me by default, but 10 seconds on the grinder to knock down the high points on the cutter jaws and now it works great (I don't use the cutter part), and is made of heavy gauge metal so you can get a lot of force into the crimp easily:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Klein-Tools-9-1-2-in-Crimping-Tool-1005SEN/100352095

I have not tried either of these on 10ga wire.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
1,509
The ratcheting crimper definitely preferred for larger gauge wire. Also useful on the smaller gauges to give good consistent crimping. Will need one for large gauge and another for the smaller gauge since there is considerable size difference between 10 and 24 gauge.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07M9MWJDJ/ref=sspa_dk_detail_2?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B07M9MWJDJ&pd_rd_w=knCcA&pf_rd_p=8a8f3917-7900-4ce8-ad90-adf0d53c0985&pd_rd_wg=GGglV&pf_rd_r=V8068Q8BY9ASD73TVZ97&pd_rd_r=d40d5de9-a959-11e9-80ff-c1ff0179d65b
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
19,466
Hi guys!

I need a good tool to work with on RVs, minimum gauge 10AWG, but it should be good for up to 24 and down to 8.
I have several different types of strippers & crimpers, but always buy Weidmuller if possible, they are a little pricey, but if doing it for a living, you want well made tools.
Also the advantage of crimp ends.
Max.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,616
I have several different types of strippers & crimpers, but always buy Weidmuller if possible, they are a little pricey, but if doing it for a living, you want well made tools.
Also the advantage of crimp ends.
Max.
If you've ever done a lot of crimping in one sitting, that belt fed tool really starts to look nice. :)
 

Janis59

Joined Aug 21, 2017
906
If that is work for home, thus the time consumption is not important factor, may economy some 1-2 k$ for not buying a professional instrument. For me I need to crimp sth like 12 mm to 22 mm thick alu wire into cable shoe well if once a couple years, therefore I`ve been cut out a two thick hard steel platelets (from 10 mm thick lorry long-leaf springs), what with a flex machine (angle grinder) formed Greek pi letter form cut-in at the exact middle, thus the both platelets together makes as accurate possible the six-corner nut-head shaped hole. At the both short-sides I grind a channel about 6 mm wide, thus there the older light vehicle leaf-springs may be used as slide rails for both thick knifes. For the instrument to press both knifes together may be considered number of options. Initially I had idea about hydraulic domcrat, but happily the prost hurry witnessed that large-sized vice are mighty enough to make the good job. The next option is larger sized hang-lock cutter, however be sure that 1 tonn is hardly too small, 5 tons are pretty good, and 20 tonn is sth "never need more". Is worth to add that just a screw is never able for so large force except the screw into screw where one have left smaller step thread and other right and rougher thread, so the resulting difference of threads is very small.
 
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Janis59

Joined Aug 21, 2017
906
Marcf: in large amperage electricians instructions are told the any current over thousand Amps the crimping is only method safe enough. One of worst methods there is soldering, what in last soviet era decade was wholespread standard for all residential summer-houses. And then happened hundreds and hundreds of fires in them, caused by self-de-soldered contacts, the tin was hardly prohibited in networks around 1990. The large current similarily than hard cold causes the grey powderizing alias tin-plague. So, if want current, or crimp, or weld (with missing and borax or alternatively TIG and argon). Rarely screws with spring-nuts are practised, but with long prescription of "But...then". Therefore I am sure, the bad portrait of crimping is coming just from bad instrument or bad made job - technology itself is not responsible for such blame.
 
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