Stuck on a resistor homework assignment

Thread Starter

Human2

Joined Dec 22, 2017
51
Okay so this is the schematic:

resistor question.png

I need to calculate R1, R2, R5 and I.

I calculated R1 = 8 ohms and R5 = 20 ohms with the help of P1(I1) and P5(U).
I then got the current at the resistor R5 which is 4 A

Now I only have to calculate the current and R2, but I just cant I tried with a lot of equasions and failed can someone
slove it or at least point me to the right direction ? Thanks in advanced
 

Jony130

Joined Feb 17, 2009
5,092
For now you can remove R5 resistor from the circuit (do you know why) and you could try to apply KVL around the loop form by the supply voltage source and R3 and R4.
And keep in mind that IR4 = I1 + IR3
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

Human2

Joined Dec 22, 2017
51
For now you can remove R5 resistor from the circuit (do you know why) and you could try to apply KVL around the loop form by the supply voltage source and R3 and R4.
And keep in mind that IR4 = I1 + IR3
Hmmm I dont know why I can remove R5 :/

And also: IR4 = I1 + IR3 -> U4 = I1 + I*R3 how did you get to that
 
Last edited:

Jony130

Joined Feb 17, 2009
5,092
Hmmm I dont know why I can remove R5 :/
Because R5 is in parallel with the voltage source. And in parallel circuits the two or more components are connected to the same nodes and, therefore, they have the exact same voltage across them.
https://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/threads/voltage-divider.66769/#post-463363
So we can for now forget about R5 and solve the rest part of a circuit.

And also: IR4 = I1 + IR3 -> U4 = I1 + I*R3 how did you get to that
The I Kirchhoff's law tell us about this stuff.

Try analysis the current path

2.png
 

Thread Starter

Human2

Joined Dec 22, 2017
51
I know that I12 + I3 = I4 and that I4 = I,
I know that U12 = U3 and that U = U12 + U4
I know that (U12/R12) + (U3/R3) = (U4/R4)
I know that I3 * R3 + I*R4 = I*R
I know that I12 * R12 + I*R4 = I*R

but I just don't see I*R4 = I12 + I * R3 :/
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
2,419
Start by considering R1 + R2 as one resistor. (Call it Rx) So now you have Rx in parallel with R3 and these are in series with R4. You know the voltage between the ends of this network is 80 volts . You don't know the current through R3 so call it Ix. You know the current through Rx. Write down the equations for the voltage drop across R4 (Call this Vx), Rx and R3 Fill in the values for the things you know. You should then be able to eliminate one of the unknowns by combinine these equations to solve for Ix. You will only really use two of these equations.
Another method would be to use Thevenins theorem.

Les.
 

Jony130

Joined Feb 17, 2009
5,092
but I just don't see I*R4 = I12 + I * R3 :/
I see the confusion.
This

IR4 = I1 + IR3

It is not equal to IR4 = I*R4 = U4 wrong.

What I ment is this
IR4 - current through R4 resistor
IR3 - current through R3 resistor

And U4 = IR4*R4

So,

I4 = I12 + I3 when I use your notation.

Is this clear now?

If so, please write a II Kirchhoff's law equation in the loop U, R3 and R4 in terms of a current and solve for I3
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

Human2

Joined Dec 22, 2017
51
Thanks I got it I inserted I3 = I4 - 2 in voltaage equation U4 = U - U3 and got that current...
I spent 1 hour on this I was trying ot do it over ressistance got cubic equation it was a mess
 
Top