Spelling arrors on purpose, your contributions here

Thread Starter

takao21203

Joined Apr 28, 2012
3,695
IN the past Ive been accused english not being my first language.
By now it is the language I have used most in my life and in which Im most fluent.
Im getting along in daily life, no difficulties to reply instantly or talk any topic, or to comprehend printed matters.
I do read the news almost every day, and I watched hundreds of movies, as well Ive been talking to many ppl over the years.
I do use social media and instant messaging too.

Anyway. I have often seen spelling errors "used" by otherwise native and well educated "speakers" or, "users of language".
Ive even seen them quite amass in printed operation manuals. To a point I cant help it but I think they do it on purpose.
As such when it is error free, it seems like this would be suspicious, either its not your native and you laerned it at university,
or it just looks unnatural if you dont make grammar and spelling mistakes so it must be you have only learned that language.

Heres is a fresh one, Ive come accross some most moutilated and gross return request for a $15 wallet (Im not the seller),
bcz the magnet not strong enough to hold the maximum quoted number of money bills.
Hard to belaive.

So heres my spelling

Magnet not strong enough to hold amimum number of cash notes.

Or its like you should avoid spelling mistakes and grammar by any means neccessary?

In a movie (US native), "The police had comed". Isnt it, "The police has come"? I think back then Id have seen that crossed out in red by my english teacher.

Well actually I do live in the UK...because the way I usually talk, people rather recognize it as irish english of some kind.

It would be "Me wallet", rather. in the UK, if someone says "We havent got any" it sounds totally different than in irish english. Pretty distinct and unmistakeable differences, youd see no difficulty to encounter them if youd be up for it.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
11,091
hi takao,
I think it is syntax/grammar that you are struggling with, not spelling.
The Yorkshire dialect/accent can be difficult to understand. [ my home town was Rotherham, 7 miles from Sheffield]

One example you quote'
"The police has come"
Should be " The police have come"

IMO using text speak will not help you develop in using the UK version of English.

E
 

killivolt

Joined Jan 10, 2010
785
I'm the last person to be saying anything on the matter, but I think he is saying post tense here " The police had comed" " opposed to " has come" present tense is as you quoted "The police have come" here in America we might say in the mid-west " The police came" then fill in why, where, when.

I've often been mistaken for a Brit because I tend to type words that don't belong in a sentence, unnecessary words. I re-read most of what I type, editing the unnecessary words, instead of just hitting post reply, but that all happens before I've had a few drinks. It's better for me not to "post reply" at that point, just put the computer on the nightstand and pick up the remote control or fall asleep.

kv
 

Thread Starter

takao21203

Joined Apr 28, 2012
3,695
hi takao,
I think it is syntax/grammar that you are struggling with, not spelling.
The Yorkshire dialect/accent can be difficult to understand. [ my home town was Rotherham, 7 miles from Sheffield]

One example you quote'
"The police has come"
Should be " The police have come"

IMO using text speak will not help you develop in using the UK version of English.

E

Nah thats from old US movie and personally, i think "The police had comed" is funny.
Hey look man, the police had comed.

My english may have been bad some 10 years ago but I notice native speakers make mistakes all the time and there is no such thing as correct grammar when people speak. Well may depend on the population group.

Youre from Rotherham or have lived there, see its a small world. Our kitchen window is looking toward a hill, basically hills everywhere anyway, and just behind these hills theres Rotherham, I havent been there so far though.

But my point was spelling errors in professional printed matter such as instruction manuals.
Maybe its done within some anti intellectual population groups?
Havent got a degree myself but rather fake news and stuff youre supposed to believe and election manipulation.

But I really mean if you dont make mistakes that could be suspicious natives definitely make lots of mistakes of course to a pattern but if you speak like supposed to be by what your (my) english teacher said, that doesnt look like anything.

Of course reading Yahoo news for years, I do see a lot of actual real world journalism, bias, and stuff.

So if what you write is error free either youre expat (foreigner) or youre overly intallectual
 

Thread Starter

takao21203

Joined Apr 28, 2012
3,695
I'm the last person to be saying anything on the matter, but I think he is saying post tense here " The police had comed" " opposed to " has come" present tense is as you quoted "The police have come" here in America we might say in the mid-west " The police came" then fill in why, where, when.

I've often been mistaken for a Brit because I tend to type words that don't belong in a sentence, unnecessary words. I re-read most of what I type, editing the unnecessary words, instead of just hitting post reply, but that all happens before I've had a few drinks. It's better for me not to "post reply" at that point, just put the computer on the nightstand and pick up the remote control or fall asleep.

kv
When I really consider the stuff that can be seen on TV, advertising, billboards, news and so forth I dont think it actually really matters.

Thats just an example, "The police had comed". Theres countless others in daily life especially when people speak, but a bit difficult to put on a forum. Ireland I think definitely would be "Me Wallet". And all kinds of cables are refered to as "yoke".
 

boatsman

Joined Jan 17, 2008
186
One of my father's teachers told us of a note he had once received from a pupil's mother. 'Dear Mr Rees, Ianto didn't go to school today because he couldn't go. When he has gone he shall come.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,607
There is colloquialism of expression in most languages.
For example the Italian word Risotto is only pronounced Ris-oh-toe in N.A. as far as I have observed.
The other thing that really irks me is when Newscasters, as someone that should know a little better IMO, make obvious miss-pronouncement of words, for e.g. we have one that repeatedly says 'In the interm' instead of Interim, among a few other faux pas.
Max.
 
Top