[SOLVED]Unused adapter to supply power to MCU

Thread Starter

Pushkar1

Joined Apr 5, 2021
205
I have an adapter I was using it to power the laptop. Adapter is ok but it's connector was damaged so It's just worthless

Adapter Ratings
Output Voltage 19 V
Output Current 3.42 A

http://infonett.co.nz/original-acer-19v-342a-adapter-5517mm

I am sure this laptop adapter can be used to supply power to the microcontroller but I just want to know some information. if I use it, can I have any problems like microcontroller got burnt, microcontroller isn't programmed.. etc

If it is safe to use for microcontroller then i will explain further planning how I'm trying to convert 19 volt into 5 volt

So please share your feedback, suggestions
 

Dave Lowther

Joined Sep 8, 2016
100
@Pushkar1 I know you said you want to adapt the laptop charger, but have you considered using a spare charger with a USB socket? Every such charger I have used has an output of approximately 5V and could be used to power your microcontroller directly with no other components. You could get an old USB cable, cut off the end that plugs into the device and then use the two power wires to connect to your microcontroller. Of course you need to make sure that the current required by your microcontroller can be supplied by the charger.
Do you know approximately how much current your microcontroller will need?
 

Thread Starter

Pushkar1

Joined Apr 5, 2021
205
@Pushkar1 I know you said you want to adapt the laptop charger, but have you considered using a spare charger with a USB socket? Every such charger I have used has an output of approximately 5V and could be used to power your microcontroller directly with no other components. .
@Dave Lowther great idea suggested, so I don't need to worry about other components for power supply. I have old mobile charger that is rated with 5V @ 2 A

Do you know approximately how much current your microcontroller will need?
I'm planning to use PIC18F45K80. I've attached datasheet for microcontroller.

I do not understand in the datasheet. how much current microcontroller will need?
 

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KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,911
@Dave Lowther great idea suggested, so I don't need to worry about other components for power supply. I have old mobile charger that is rated with 5V @ 2 A


I'm planning to use PIC18F45K80. I've attached datasheet for microcontroller.

I do not understand in the datasheet. how much current microcontroller will need?
The amount of current needed will depend on what you are using the microcontroller for and what other equipment you have attached to it that needs powering. If you do as Doggydave suggested in post #2 you will have a good 5V supply for anything up to 3 amps. You could safely use a 5A invertor to give you even more current.
 

Dave Lowther

Joined Sep 8, 2016
100
@Dave Lowther
I have old mobile charger that is rated with 5V @ 2 A
I'm planning to use PIC18F45K80. I've attached datasheet for microcontroller.
I do not understand in the datasheet. how much current microcontroller will need?
I've never used a PIC. My experience with using AVR microcontrollers (as used in many Arduino boards) is that it's easier to measure the current than estimate it from the data sheet. It depends on what you are driving with the microcontroller, e.g. the current for any LEDs you might want to use. I expect that 2A will be more than enough. In your position I would check the output from the charger is the correct voltage, then connect it up to the microcontroller, with any outputs enabled for max current draw, and then measure the current. That advice is for home / hobby projects. For a commercial product things would need to be done more formally.
 

Dodgydave

Joined Jun 22, 2012
10,050
@Dave Lowther great idea suggested, so I don't need to worry about other components for power supply. I have old mobile charger that is rated with 5V @ 2 A


I'm planning to use PIC18F45K80. I've attached datasheet for microcontroller.

I do not understand in the datasheet. how much current microcontroller will need?
Pic's use milliamps when running and micro or nana amps when in Sleep mode.
 

Thread Starter

Pushkar1

Joined Apr 5, 2021
205
you will have a good 5V supply for anything up to 3 amps. You could safely use a 5A invertor to give you even more current.
Sorry, I don't understand What do you mean by a good supply?

I've this adapter rated with 5V @ 2 A

https://www.flipkart.com/lenovo-wal...3-support-all-models-white/p/itmfc7esahhnnfyt

is this not a good 5V DC power supply for microcontroller ?

I will connect the below components with the microcontroller

LED * 4
Push Button * 4
Seven Segment * 4
SPI device * 1
I2C device * 1
Uart circuit maxrs232
LCD 16-2 * 1

Will 5V @ 2 adapter not be enough for all of these?
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,911
@KeithWalker but for now i have following question.

Is 5V adapter I've is a good or bad choice to supply power for microcontroller?
A 5V microcontroller on its own only needs a very small amount of current and will run quite happily when powered by a USB charger but you can't do very much with it on its own. As I mentioned in post #5, the amount of current needed will depend on what you are using the microcontroller for and what other equipment you have attached to it that needs powering.
 
Last edited:

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
9,225
Far more practical and much less complicated would be to replace the damaged connector on that 19 volt power supply. With decent soldering skills it should work out very well. The hard part will be to locate the replacement connector. Some computer makers use a third conductor in the power cable so that the supply and computer will only work with an OEM supply. My HP is like that, which I did not know when I got it. That would have been a deal breaker and I would have picked a different brand if I had known.
 
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