[SOLVED]Making tracks on PCB board

Thread Starter

Pushkar1

Joined Apr 5, 2021
416
I am a hobbyist Right now I can't design PCB and send to manufacturing houses, there are many reasons for this. But I want to make permanent power supply circuit on the PCB for microcontroller

I'm worried about the tracks for general purpose PCB. as can see in picture i have made a track so if i make track in this way will the circuit work

IMG_20210709_145724.jpg
..

I know it's not the right way but I'm practicing so no problem even if it doesn't work. If It's Impossible I Won't Attempt It
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,768
You can use a wire from one hole to another several pads away, then tack the wire to each pad it crosses. If calculations show if it too small for the current, you can parallel another directly adjacent so that are soldered in tandem to all pads.
 

Thread Starter

Pushkar1

Joined Apr 5, 2021
416
That's the way to do it but it's easier if you have the right vector board. I've made fairly complex controller prototype boards using vector through solder pad perfboard.
Dual side solder pad
View attachment 243034View attachment 243035
@nsaspook Interesting work How do you power microcontroller ?

I would like to know more about the power supply circuit. I'm planning to make 5V DC power supply for microcontroller. I've some components from old equipment's that can be used to make power supply.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
24,651
Use whatever wire you have to connect one pad to the next.

Instead of cutting off the component leads I bend the leads to the next component.

You can also use wire, insulated or bare, on the component side to make connections.

Your soldering iron is too hot or you are taking too long to make a solder joint. Excessive heat will cause the pads to lift off the board.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
8,912
@nsaspook Interesting work How do you power microcontroller ?

I would like to know more about the power supply circuit. I'm planning to make 5V DC power supply for microcontroller. I've some components from old equipment's that can be used to make power supply.
I used a external 5vdc wall-wart for power and onboard regulators if needed for lower voltages.

With so many modern parts only in SMD packages it's good to have stick-on vector board SMD adapters too for projects.
PXL_20210709_172047634.jpg
This is a LCD backlight LED driver chip on a vector board using the adapter.
https://www.onsemi.com/pdf/datasheet/cat4238-d.pdf
 

Thread Starter

Pushkar1

Joined Apr 5, 2021
416
I used a external 5vdc wall-wart for power and onboard regulators if needed for lower voltages.
@nsaspook

Do you have the circuit diagram for the prototype board?

In the circuit you have used PIC18F45K80 microcontroller.

What components have you used for microcontroller and what value components have you used?

I know this information would have been given in the datasheet but I'm curios to know what you have used
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
8,912
@nsaspook

Do you have the circuit diagram for the prototype board?

In the circuit you have used PIC18F45K80 microcontroller.

What components have you used for microcontroller and what value components have you used?

I know this information would have been given in the datasheet but I'm curios to know what you have used
Both of those prototype board projects used the PIC18F45K80. The Dual side solder pad board doesn't have a circuit diagram as I was really testing some PIC32 SDcard routines using something that I'd already built to test some SPI IPC routines.


This is a version of the mphase board.

https://github.com/nsaspook/mphase/blob/xc2.05_version/board/mphase.pdf
https://github.com/nsaspook/mphase/blob/xc2.05_version/board/mphase_board.pdf

Main application C code.
https://raw.githubusercontent.com/nsaspook/mphase/xc2.05_version/app.c
 

Dave Lowther

Joined Sep 8, 2016
106
I am a hobbyist Right now I can't design PCB and send to manufacturing houses, there are many reasons for this. But I want to make permanent power supply circuit on the PCB for microcontroller
I use KiCad (which is free), usually for getting PCBs made, but sometimes for layout on stripboard (veroboard) or those single pad prototype boards. I find the double sided prototype boards more robust because the plated through holes stop the pads coming off the board when making modifications.

The grid in KiCad can be set to 0.1 inch to correspond to the pitch of the holes on the prototype board:

1625915390587.png
The blue tracks can be bare wire. I use insulated wire for the brown tracks which cross the blue tracks. As someone already said, the short blue tracks can be made by bending the component leads.
1625915575956.png
An advantage of using Kicad, or some other layout package, is that one ends up with a good record of the schematic and layout, rather than having to do it by hand on e.g. 0.1 inch grid graph paper. It's also much easier to edit using KiCad than using an eraser and a pencil.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
13,573
Right now I can't design PCB and send to manufacturing houses, there are many reasons for this.
Even if you're not going to have the boards made, doing a board layout will help you with component placement and routing. I've never had a board made, but I still do layouts for them.

Here's a 4 discrete flip flop layout and the corresponding board (that was modified on-the-fly for 6 flip flops to fill up the board). There were so few wire crossings that I could use uninsulated wire for most connections. The board had a pad per hole on one side. I put the pads on the top so I didn't have to worry about them creating shorts.
1625933081538.png
flipFlopBot.jpg
 
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