Solderless breadboard equivalent for RF

Thread Starter

Zeeus

Joined Apr 17, 2019
467
Can you please forgive Zeeus for asking on your thread?

Please for RF, see copper clad is a way forward but what if to design not schematic from book : just testing my own design to see if works : is there something like breadboard for RF? so can make mistakes and correct without soldering and de-soldering

Thanks
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
5,941
The best method is a printed circuit board. You can can use a router to make patterns. Have had good results doing this on a couple of high frequency and fast pulse projects.

upload_2019-6-16_14-1-8.png
It is not pretty but it gets the job done quickly.

upload_2019-6-16_14-5-24.png
You can also use dead bug style. With this we were able to verify a comparator with a 1 ns response time. No waiting around for a PCB to be designed and delivered.

Also from Harry Lythall: http://213.114.131.21/blocks/deadbug_0.htm
 

Thread Starter

Zeeus

Joined Apr 17, 2019
467
The best method is a printed circuit board. You can can use a router to make patterns. Have had good results doing this on a couple of high frequency and fast pulse projects.

View attachment 179815
It is not pretty but it gets the job done quickly.

View attachment 179816
You can also use dead bug style. With this we were able to verify a comparator with a 1 ns response time. No waiting around for a PCB to be designed and delivered.

Also from Harry Lythall: http://213.114.131.21/blocks/deadbug_0.htm
The thing is TS will make lots of mistakes with trying to form circuit and can not keep soldering and desoldering..Anyways, thanks : guess there is no way around it

or maybe will try breadboard and if you say it can't be done :
"Man who says it cannot be done shall not stop the man doing it."

btw, what's 2nd circuit?
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
5,941
There was an engneer in an engineering department in which I once worked who built up a very large and complex RF based communications system using dead bug construction and trial-and-error techniques to design the circuit. The beauty of dead bug construction is that you can change parts at will all you want. In this one example when it was time to exhibit the product at an annual industry show he did not show up and we could never get the system to work. Too little formality can be a problem.

The first photo shows a 330 MHz transmitter, the second photo was found on the web.
 
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