Single chip to replace two 4040s?

Thread Starter

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
2,756
Yo…

So I intend to use two 4040 ripple counters to address a large EPROM (1 megabit) I need 19 outputs. (in sequence)

So I know it’s a long shot, but does anyone know of a single chip counter that has 19 outputs. (with reset line if there are more than 19)
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
10,943
Back before everything shifted to FPGA's, a 32-macrocell CPLD would do this plus a lot of whatever other external logic in a single package for $2-3. Miss those parts, know of nothing equivalent today.

Go with the 2nd 4020. Nothing will be smaller, lower purchase cost, **lower design cost**, lower maintenance, lower, lower, lower ...

AND - I did a lot of EPROM and EEPROM-based logic back in the day. What is this for?

ak
 
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danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
4,057
PSOC 4 would do it. See attached. Could have been up to 32 bit
counter, lots of other resources available. In this case no code
would have to be written, normally one has to at least issue a start
command in C with an API call, but this is just logic.

Dev board ($4) -



http://www.cypress.com/documentation/development-kitsboards/psoc-4-cy8ckit-049-4xxx-prototyping-kits

Free tool and free compiler -

http://www.cypress.com/products/psoc-creator-integrated-design-environment-ide

Google "PSOC 101" for a multi series group of videos to learn, the first
4 basics.

The attached component list is a list of resources available in PSOC 5LP, the 4
is a subset of this. The 5LP is high end family, its equivalent board $10.


Regards, Dana.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
10,943
So, it's a PROGRAMMABLE system on a chip, and "one has to at least issue a start command in C with an API call", but "In this case no code would have to be written" ... ?

Interesting definition of "code".

"I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail."
- Abraham Maslow, The Psychology of Science: A Reconnaissance, 1966

ak
 

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
4,057
PSOC has an array of resources on chip, called components.

Most components have C APIs associated with them where one configures/manipulates
the component. This includes a C API Start() that needs to be called to start it. Not starting it
or turning it off with a Stop() manages power.

Basic logic does not need any "code" , no Start() needed. The part (most
families) have an ARM core on them, but there are many capabilities on
the part where no "additional" code has to be written, beyond the auto
generated C and ASM startup code for the overall part.

Hammers are good, I would add wheels to that list as well :)

Regards, Dana.
 

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
4,057
Just out of curiosity what are you using the output of the counters for, what
does rest of system need to complete project ? Analog and Digital ? Besides
the EPROM ?

Whats the organization of the EPROM, 128 x 8, 1M x 1.....?

Regards, Dana.
 

Thread Starter

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
2,756
The counters are used to address an EPROM, for all of the usual stuff, I guess...Programming, checking validity that sort of thing.

The ones I need a larger counter for are organized the way most of the smaller ones I have used...XXX x 8 bit bytes.

I'm not trying to be rude, but I'm not going to go into the project specifics.
 

BobaMosfet

Joined Jul 1, 2009
2,105
PSOC has an array of resources on chip, called components.

Most components have C APIs associated with them where one configures/manipulates
the component. This includes a C API Start() that needs to be called to start it. Not starting it
or turning it off with a Stop() manages power.

Basic logic does not need any "code" , no Start() needed. The part (most
families) have an ARM core on them, but there are many capabilities on
the part where no "additional" code has to be written, beyond the auto
generated C and ASM startup code for the overall part.

Hammers are good, I would add wheels to that list as well :)

Regards, Dana.
API = Application Programming Interface. This is usually a language written on top of another language and parsed. When you refer to 'C API' I wonder if you are being presented with an API, which would not be 'C', or a C _function_, which is actual C code in a library you link in? I'm curious as to which it actually is.
 

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
4,057
API = Application Programming Interface. This is usually a language written on top of another language and parsed. When you refer to 'C API' I wonder if you are being presented with an API, which would not be 'C', or a C _function_, which is actual C code in a library you link in? I'm curious as to which it actually is.
It is a somewhat generic term, its usually a combination of C and ASM
in the API. When component is placed/used on schematic, then that
components API library is linked in based on calls as necessary. I am not
a GNU expert (PSOC Compiler) but I think it only links in calls that are used.

Regards, Dana.
 

Thread Starter

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
2,756
So...I'm just going to go with one 4040 and one 4025...saves me a whopping two pins over two 4040s! :cool:

Thanks again to anybody who might have done a search, or made a suggestion.
 
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