Simple transistor regulated power supply

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,012
That to get 12.7 volts at the base for the output to be in regulation, the output can be no lower than 44.5V with the resistor values shown and the pot all the way to the top, i.e. the minimum regulated output voltage is 44.5V.
Am I calculating the output of the full bridge incorrectly? I was using 24VAC RMS from the transformer, multiply by 1.414 to get peak voltage = 34V, then subtract 0.6V for diode drop = 32.5.

How are you getting to > 40 volts (or, more specifically, what am I doing wrong)?
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
1,867
but you cannot have 44V output and base at 12.7V and potentiometer at maximum.

when pot is at max, MPSA will conduct, pulling base of darlington lower and output voltage...
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
1,867
Am I calculating the output of the full bridge incorrectly? I was using 24VAC RMS from the transformer, multiply by 1.414 to get peak voltage = 34V, then subtract 0.6V for diode drop = 32.5.

How are you getting to > 40 volts (or, more specifically, what am I doing wrong)?
that is correct... i don't know where 40+ volts came from
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
26,035
How are you getting to > 40 volts (or, more specifically, what am I doing wrong)?
There's nothing wrong with your calculation for determining the unregulated DC voltage.
But I'm not talking about that voltage, I'm referring to the output voltage.
My point is that the output can be no lower than 44.5V for a regulated output.
This means the unregulated input voltage to the regulator would need to be greater than that.
Thus the output will never be regulated without a change of the resistor values in series with the pot to allow a lower output voltage adjustment.

Make sense?
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,012
There's nothing wrong with your calculation for determining the unregulated DC voltage.
But I'm not talking about that voltage, I'm referring to the output voltage.
My point is that the output can be no lower than 44.5V for a regulated output.
This means the unregulated input voltage to the regulator would need to be greater than that.
Thus the output will never be regulated without a change of the resistor values in series with the pot to allow a lower output voltage adjustment.

Make sense?
Understood. Thanks.
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
1,867
sigh....facepalm...
my bad, i guess i need to start paying attention and reading values or comments... 10k is way too large (as mentioned in first reply)
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
10,778
you have forgotten to include transformer regulation. The 24v ac output is at full rated load. at no load, depending on transformer, it would be (typically) 12-25% higher.
So, unless the transformer is very oversized for the application, then 35V will not be achievable at full output current.
 

davideather

Joined Dec 12, 2016
33
it always depends on the transformer. in general, big transformers have better regulation, so going large *may* not help at all. the real solution is to use a higher voltage transformer, but the op may be ok if he does not need much current at 35 voltage. check out a supplier like element14 or newark - they provide data sheets. regulation is not always expressed as a percentage - it can be like this - full load voltage 6v, open circuit voltage 6.9v (which works out to 15%). the output voltage roughy scales linearly for this example the output voltage at half load would be 6.45v
 
Top