Sieg X2D Mill Issue. Has anyone ever seen this problem before? Any Ideas? Thanks!

Thread Starter

JK29

Joined Mar 22, 2019
32
I have a Sieg X2D Mini Mill and have been having some strange issues. I was milling along some slots on a home project, minding my own business when bam; the GFCI socket in my garage tripped and the Sieg Mill blew it's 5am (5mmx20mm) fuse.

I ran to the hardware and picked up two more fuses. Now whenever I turn on the machine the fuse will blow and the GFCI socket in my garage will trip.

Here is a video showing the issue:

Anyone have any ideas? I'm not sure how to trouble shoot this guy. Thanks for any help!
Cheers,
JK
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,401
Can you confirm the type of motor? DC, BLDC, AC induction?
If the former two, there should be a electronic controller of some sort.
Max.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,401
After a closer look, it appears you have the DC motor, so the controller probably has shorted semiconductors in the power section.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

JK29

Joined Mar 22, 2019
32
After a closer look, it appears you have the DC motor, so the controller probably has shorted semiconductors in the power section.
Max.
Yes sir, it is a DC motor. You mean the "power section" of the circuit board right? (Sorry about how illiterate I am with this stuff)

I've just removed the board from the machine and plan to send it out to Pete Olduhfguy Repair Service. He works on these little mills.

https://olduhfguy.wordpress.com/2013/11/07/feedback-page-for-olduhfguy/
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,997
Sorry guys for my ignorance. What exactly am I looking for for a short. Burn spot? Exposed wire touching the metal frame?
That is the very firstbthing that I would look for, a bare wire touching the metal frame. What the information that we already have indicates is that it is a direct short circuit from the "black wire" side to the frame. To make checking simpler and possible, you need to create a test device that adds an incandescent light bulb in series with the line side of the power cord. That will help with two aspects: First, it will avoid fuse blowing, and second, it will indicate if you fix the problem by touching something. BUT be cautioned because it will probably leave the frame of the mill hot, with something near the mains voltage. So you will need to use "hot frame" precautions while doing the investigation. This includes unplugging the mill every time you want to touch it and move something. But first, with it unplugged, just open it and look. You may immediately find the problem.
AND, if you live in or near 48067 zip code I may be able to help in person.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,401
Yes sir, it is a DC motor. You mean the "power section" of the circuit board right? (Sorry about how illiterate I am with this stuff)

I've just removed the board from the machine and plan to send it out to Pete Olduhfguy Repair Service. He works on these little mills.
I believe that was one of the SCR bridge types, so there is a chance than one or more of the bridge devices are shorted.
I have obtained the replacements from DigiKey.
They later went to a Brushless DC motor and PWM controller.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

JK29

Joined Mar 22, 2019
32
That is the very firstbthing that I would look for, a bare wire touching the metal frame. What the information that we already have indicates is that it is a direct short circuit from the "black wire" side to the frame. To make checking simpler and possible, you need to create a test device that adds an incandescent light bulb in series with the line side of the power cord. That will help with two aspects: First, it will avoid fuse blowing, and second, it will indicate if you fix the problem by touching something. BUT be cautioned because it will probably leave the frame of the mill hot, with something near the mains voltage. So you will need to use "hot frame" precautions while doing the investigation. This includes unplugging the mill every time you want to touch it and move something. But first, with it unplugged, just open it and look. You may immediately find the problem.
AND, if you live in or near 48067 zip code I may be able to help in person.
Thanks for the tips sir. I live in Texas so that won't work out (too bad!). I'll have to make one of these testers.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,997
Thanks for the tips sir. I live in Texas so that won't work out (too bad!). I'll have to make one of these testers.
OK on Texas, That is a long drive from here, so no service call. Mechanical failures of wiring in machine tools does happen. Sometimes they are easy to find, sometimes not. Once you get that simple light bulb test setup connected, you can use a plastic rod to wiggle wires and see if the bulb flickers. That will let you know that you are poking the problem area.
Are you the first owner of the mill? Often somebody changes something and then problems arise. Things like an added light wiring that is not done correctly.
 

Thread Starter

JK29

Joined Mar 22, 2019
32
OK on Texas, That is a long drive from here, so no service call. Mechanical failures of wiring in machine tools does happen. Sometimes they are easy to find, sometimes not. Once you get that simple light bulb test setup connected, you can use a plastic rod to wiggle wires and see if the bulb flickers. That will let you know that you are poking the problem area.
Are you the first owner of the mill? Often somebody changes something and then problems arise. Things like an added light wiring that is not done correctly.
Do you happen to have a picture of your testing unit?

I am the first owner.

Thanks!
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,997
Do you happen to have a picture of your testing unit?

I am the first owner.

Thanks!
It vis too simple to need a picture, and besides that, I only assemble such a tester when I need it. A light socket, possibly such as woukld be one of those round types intended to have a bare bulb, that is usually mounted on what is called an "octagon" box, is a stable way to support the light bulb. Then the outlet is just wired in series with that. For testing applications it is better to not connect a green-wire ground at the outlet that the mill will plug into. Of course, at that point you would discover that the short circuit is to the mill frame and not to the neutral wire. If that is indeed the case then you will need to connect the green-wire ground at the outlet.
For a map, the black wire from the test rig power cord will tie to the
gold" screw on the light socket, then a wire from the silver terminal on the light socket to the gold terminal on the outlet, then the white wire from the tester power cord to the silver terminal on the outlet. The green wire from that power cord can tie to the green screw on the outlet. Caution in using this setup is vital as there is mains voltage open to touching. So first the mill is plugged into the tester outlet, and then the tester is plugged into a power outlet. At this point all poking, prodding, and wire wiggling must be done with an adequately insulated object.
 

Thread Starter

JK29

Joined Mar 22, 2019
32
Yes sir, it is a DC motor. You mean the "power section" of the circuit board right? (Sorry about how illiterate I am with this stuff)

I've just removed the board from the machine and plan to send it out to Pete Olduhfguy Repair Service. He works on these little mills.

https://olduhfguy.wordpress.com/2013/11/07/feedback-page-for-olduhfguy/
Got my board back today. Mill is working great again. If anyone runs into a problem like this Pete at Olduhfguy repair can fix you up!
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,997
Hey.. This is an Electronic Forum! :D
Did he say what it was? Was it pricey?
Max.
Hey Max, I am sure that you have seen how very far some threads wander in this forum. I am not sure if they wander as much in some of the more specific ones or not. In addition, commenting on specific service provides and products is OK because it allows others to avoid the bad actors. And also it points to the very good ones.
 
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