Sending power to a motor

Thread Starter

Bobby Gabijan

Joined Feb 7, 2019
8
Hello all, I'm new here and am amazed at all the information available! I am new to electronics and have a question about sending power (12V) to a motor/actuator. I need to be able to send power using any of the three different power wires with out back feeding the others. Can ya'll help?
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
939
Alberthall's suggestion is the simplest solution based on the info so far, but there may be better ones.

What is the current draw of the motor, in particular it's stall current? As you say it's an actuator, does it run in both directions?

How is the selection of power source made? Are they all remote or local to motor. A better understanding of your system and intent would help give the most effective and accurate advice.
 

Thread Starter

Bobby Gabijan

Joined Feb 7, 2019
8
Not sure of the current draw of the motor. The actuator does move in both directions and is part of the assembly. It is a mini van lift gate motor being repurposed. From the inside of my truck there is a momentary up/down switch that when selected will lock (if unlocked) the actuator and drive the motor down. I also would need to send power to the same actuator to unlock it if I select to drop (free fall) the tail gate. When closing the tail gate from the open/unlocked position, I will need to send power back to the actuator to lock it while driving the motor to the up position.
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
939
OK, thats useful info. Just to clarify terminology, there's a motor to raise & lower the assembly, and there's a mechanical arrangement 'actuator' that moves the platform from vertical 'gate' to horizontal 'bed' as its lowered and raises it to the 'gate' position as its lifted when the actuator is activated (locked).. You can electrically unlock it and manually drop the 'gate' to the 'bed' position, while in the raised location.

So motor up/down and actuator lock/unlock needed?
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
939
OK and you want to:
1. lower lift/drop bed or raise lift/close gate from your cab, with one touch.
2. lower lift/drop bed or raise lift/close gate from tail end of vehicle.
3. raise and lower lift with bed down from tail end of vehicle.
4. drop bed while in raised position from tail end of vehicle.

Actuator is normally locked, powered to unlock? Has to remain powered while lift in use going up&down

Does lift stop at ends automatically (has limit switches).
 
Last edited:

Thread Starter

Bobby Gabijan

Joined Feb 7, 2019
8
1. "Down" Momentary switch from cab=Lock Motor Gears via Lock/Unlock actuator, send power to tail gate open actuators and drive motor down.
2. "Up" Momentary switch from cab= Lock Actuator and drive Motor up.
3. "Drop" Momentary Tail gate free fall= Unlock Tail Gate motor Lock/Unlock Actuator, and actuate tail gate open actuators.
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
939
hmmm, trying to envision how that works. Do you know manufacturer/model # of lift? I've looked at 3 or 4 examples on the web and not seen anything quite like what you describe.
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
939
Think I've found the relevant wiring diagram. Is that the connector on the top there (black/red)? How many connections are there?
 

Irving

Joined Jan 30, 2016
939
Added thought... do you have the liftgate control module and wiring harness as well? Or just the motor unit?

Have you tested the motor and latch clutch (that what the actuator lock appears to be called on the wiring diagrams)?

It might be easier to do what you need with the control module too. It takes a low current momentary switch and manages the full cycle operation including motor direction and clutch timing and monitors a couple of interlock switches to control max opening position and prevent damage to the mechanism. The control module also monitors motor current to check for pinch and stall (i.e closing the gate on someone and opening it under a low ceiling) - these safety features might translate to your use.

If not you ideally need to replicate some of that functionality to avoid running high current wiring from cab to liftgate, and to protect the mechanism from overrun.

Oh, and another thought - is your truck a 12v or 24v system (not knowing what truck you have).
 
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