Reverse lift

Discussion in 'Physics' started by krooyakkers, Dec 3, 2018.

  1. nsaspook

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    Aug 27, 2009
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    It's actually not that complicated.
    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1506.00494.pdf
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018 at 9:48 AM
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  2. krooyakkers

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    Its the saying stuff has to be compatable to our current physics that gets to me. Its putting laws on the universe that i think will prevent us from seeing things that defy laws. People see flying objects all the time and those seem to defy normal physics. And it depends if u believe or are aware of different realities or multiple realities. A lot of what our reality is seems to come from the senses we get from our brains but we are not usimg all of our brains so as we unlock them there could be more senses and even sight of energies we could not see before
     
  3. nsaspook

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    In science you just can't make things up because you want it to happen. Nature didn't need human brains to evolve flying objects over billions of years and there is zero evidence that human brains process some magically arranged set of atoms that can change the fundamental nature of the universe just by thinking about it. It's easy to confuse the inner reality of our imaginations with the physical reality. That, for me is the magic of the human brain, the ability to imagine a possible future with known facts and to extrapolate those facts into a real future.

    You might say, how do we know the physical reality is real? Easy, stand in front of a moving train.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018 at 10:32 AM
  4. bogosort

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    To appreciate the limits of physics, one must first understand physics.

    See above.
     
  5. cmartinez

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    I think I'm beginning to understand what you're saying. It's all about conservation of momentum, if I'mnot mistaken.

    And yet... one thing for certain at this point is that we don't yet know everything there is to know about physics. In fact, we're still badly wanting an explanation for what more than 95% of the universe actually is... I can only hope that at least half of that mistery will be solved in the 40 to 45 years more of life that I can hopefully expect.
     
  6. BR-549

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    Momentum is neither conserved or equalized. Almost all the momentum in the universe is angular, not linear.

    All emission is loss of momentum.

    There are two types of angular momentum. Left and right. The right has about 2000 fold the momentum of the left.

    This asymmetric ratio is constant thru-out the cosmos.

    How would such a momentum mismatch affect a universe? What would such a potential do?
     
  7. nsaspook

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    C O E/M is an important limitation but that can be fudged a little at the micro scales. NO FREE LUNCH aka the thermodynamic laws hold without even a scientific hint they fail in closed/isolated systems. Even 'God' had to work 6 'days' to create the universe. So if there is available energy outside our universe maybe a god-like super-being can tap it and reorder entropy but I don't see humans belonging in that class for a while.
    http://physics.bu.edu/~duffy/py105/Firstlaw.html
    http://physics.bu.edu/~duffy/py105/Secondlaw.html

    http://physics.bu.edu/~duffy/py105.html
     
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  8. cmartinez

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    Not to veer of course... but this is getting interesting... Where would you say that the energy released (and that was necessary for its expansion, I'm not talking about the matetter-antimatter annihilation process) at the moment of the Big Bang came from? I mean, it appears to me that at that moment a huge amount of energy was somehow infused into the universe.
     
  9. nsaspook

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    The ultimate mystery. We just don't know how it's possible to have infinite density and zero volume. Infinities are useful in mathematics but not so much in explaining reality.:(

    Energy–momentum conservation is not conserved globally in general relativity except in certain special cases. We don't understand the physics of space-time, energy and mass when globally is zero in dimensions of space-time.
    http://www.desy.de/user/projects/Physics/Relativity/GR/energy_gr.html
     
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  10. cmartinez

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    Yeah... for me, another mind-boggling theory is Mach's principle... it ranks right up there with the origin of the universe itself, imho
     
  11. nsaspook

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    I would think that most physicists would say that Mach's principle was superseded by general relativity and the GR version of the universe was proven more useful for physical prediction of local interaction from distant events by the detection of gravitational waves.

    https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/what-are-gw
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018 at 6:21 PM
  12. Glenn Holland

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    Reminds me of a physic problem where a rotating lawn sprinkler was connected to a vacuum line instead of a pressurized hose.

    Which way will it spin?
     
  13. cmartinez

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    I first learned about that problem when I read Richard Feynman's bio "Surely you're joking" ... my conclusion was that the thing would spin in the opposite direction.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018 at 12:29 AM
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  14. krooyakkers

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    Then why is so much of it turned off. All thst space for what? Guess u dont believe we can connect with our brains. Arent they electrical signals. wWere just not in full control of it i dunno i just kinda think of a brain like a computer. Those use electical signals like we do and can connect with other electrical circuits wirelessly. I dont really have any experience with what these signals in our brain exactly are but ive been told electrical.Maybe need the right element to connect.
     
  15. nsaspook

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    You only have to look at where the pressure differentials are in space (vortex inside the hub) for directed flows. I too remember reading about Feynman doing this experiment.
    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b38b/a03b7cf1a401400577866618bd9680e85f28.pdf
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018 at 9:12 AM
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  16. nsaspook

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    The created vortex inside the sprinkler hub is easy to see with a 'Cyclone' type vacuum cleaner that's designed with only one offset inlet to force a fixed vortex rotation direction.
     
  17. bogosort

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    One way to think about this is to remember that notions such as energy are part of a model and don't make sense outside of the model. The poorly-named Big Bang marks the edge of most models. So, talking about energy at t <= 0 is akin to talking about the color of a road map outside of its plane. In other words, we can't say anything meaningful in the language of the model about stuff outside the model.

    While that's all true and fine, it's ultimately unsatisfying. So, another way to think about this is to consider that the total energy of the universe has always been and will always be the same. Note that energy only becomes interesting when it can be used to do work, and this is where the notion of entropy comes in. In the plasma soup of the Big Bang, entropy was high but far lower than the maximum entropy for the total energy of the universe. Quantum uncertainty ensured that there were tiny difference in the initial distribution of energy, and those gradients -- driven by competing forces -- kick-started expansion. The abundance of usable energy allowed the universe to do work, creating atoms and galaxies and us, as it races to maximize entropy and reach thermal equilibrium.
     
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