Replacement transformer for 1960s microscope power supply

Thread Starter

Berkowwm

Joined Jun 29, 2018
1
Hello,

I am new to this forum and have almost no experience with transformers. I am trying to restore life to a 60's-era microscope power supply (American Optical 1036A microscope with a 1051 transformer). Does anyone know if the transformer below is still made, and where I might find one (or its modern equivalent)? What concerns me is that the existing transformer has many different leads that connect to some type of potentiometer, and I haven't really seen anything like it. Photos below.

Specs:
AC, 60 cycle
Primary: 115V
Secondary: 4.5 to 7.5V
29 V.A.

If anyone can help me find the right part, I'd really appreciate it!

Thank you for your time,
Will

0628181732-1.jpg 0629181000a-1.jpg 0629181010-1.jpg 0629181011-1.jpg
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
10,195
hi B,
Welcome to AAC.
The transformer has a tapped secondary winding.
Each tap is a slightly different voltage.
The pot is a tap selector switch.
Rotating the switch will supply a different voltage to the lamp, brightness variation.
E

BTW: Why do you think the transformer is at fault.??
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
Hello,

I am new to this forum and have almost no experience with transformers. I am trying to restore life to a 60's-era microscope power supply (American Optical 1036A microscope with a 1051 transformer). Does anyone know if the transformer below is still made, and where I might find one (or its modern equivalent)? What concerns me is that the existing transformer has many different leads that connect to some type of potentiometer, and I haven't really seen anything like it. Photos below.

Specs:
AC, 60 cycle
Primary: 115V
Secondary: 4.5 to 7.5V
29 V.A.

If anyone can help me find the right part, I'd really appreciate it!

Thank you for your time,
Will

View attachment 155317 View attachment 155318 View attachment 155319 View attachment 155320
Its a wafer switch - not a pot. If its for an illumination bulb, you might get away with a multi voltage DC adaptor as suggested.

If there's any chance of converting to white LED - the lower current draw would make it MUCH easier.

Some super duper microscopes have selectable target illumination colour for investigating stained samples - an RGB LED could have interesting possibilities.
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
6,459
This is undoubtedly a custom transformer. If the microscope manufacturer is still operating and if you are very lucky you can get a replacement from them. Otherwise, how are you at building small circuits (I am thinking more common transformer with a dimmer circuit)?

Please consider Dodgydave's post #3, you don't want to go and solve a problem that isn't one. If it turns out to be the transformer one of us can suggest a solution.
 
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