Reading power data on printer and cord, is it compatible?

Thread Starter

ritarm89

Joined Nov 1, 2022
3
Hi, I lost my printer cable and i need to replace it.

on the printer, near the plug hole it's written 100-240V~ 60/50Hz 350mA. From what I know, that should be the INPUT, it should mean that it works at a range of 100-240V, so basically anywhere, at 60/50hertz and require 350mA to work.

I found a cable, on the cable i see written 300/300V but on the cable plug it's written 2.5A, 250V~.

from my knowledge, but i might be wrong, the cord could have higher A than the plug, the plug just won't use more than necessary, but the tension must be the same, and in this case 250V is bigger than 100-240V.

If i'm correct, i can't use this cord or i'll burn the device. Am i correct? how to chose the right one? I tried using it but didn't work, does it mean i burned my printer?
Thank you
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
27,880
By "cable" I assume you mean a power cord?

As long as the ratings on the power cord are AT LEAST what is needed by the device, you are fine.

So your power cord is limited by the rating on the plug (although you don't give a current rating for the cord itself, so that could be lower, but probably not).

Are the plugs at both ends compatible with your power source and your printer's power jack?
 

Thread Starter

ritarm89

Joined Nov 1, 2022
3
By "cable" I assume you mean a power cord?

As long as the ratings on the power cord are AT LEAST what is needed by the device, you are fine.

So your power cord is limited by the rating on the plug (although you don't give a current rating for the cord itself, so that could be lower, but probably not).

Are the plugs at both ends compatible with your power source and your printer's power jack?
yes, power cord sorry.

so it's not a problem if on the cord end it's written 250V and it's bigger than what's written on the printer?

I tried plugging it but it didn't turn on, does it mean i burned it? how can i find the right cord to buy?
Thank you
 

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WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
27,880
Burned what? The cord? The printer?

If the cord is good and the power source is good, then there is likely something wrong with the printer.
 

Thread Starter

ritarm89

Joined Nov 1, 2022
3
Burned what? The cord? The printer?

If the cord is good and the power source is good, then there is likely something wrong with the printer.
How can I understand if they are just not compatible, or which one is not working? how to find the right compatible cord?
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
27,880
How can I understand if they are just not compatible, or which one is not working? how to find the right compatible cord?
Power cords are pretty simple and ubiquitous. It's just two pieces of wire in this case. As long as the two ends are physically compatible with what they plug into and there is no sign of physical damage anywhere, it should be fine. Do you have access to a multimeter (a voltmeter) to check if you are getting line voltage at the printer end of the cord with it plugged into the wall (but not into the printer).

Have you tried going to the manufacturer's website?

Just about any place that sells printers or other electronics should have replacement power cords.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
27,679
When asking for advice on instruments and devices please post the make and model of the device.

From the photograph shown of the input power connector, this appears to be a universal 100-240VAC 50-60Hz power requirement. The power cord is simply a 2-conductor cable. Any power cable with matching connectors will work.

If the printer does not turn the problem could be in the cable or in the printer itself.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
13,778
The ratings on any power cord represent the maximums that it can safely handle. That means that the insulation is claimed to be adequate for up to that printed voltage. The current listed is the maximum that the cord is intended to carry, so if the device powered uses less than that amount it will be within limits and perfectly OK.
Power cords can suffer damage from external sources, mostly from water damage to the connector ends, but also from physical abuse of the cord, such as pulling the cord to unplug it, or crushing the cord by putting heavy weight on it, or animals chewing on them. Otherwise they serve well and last a very long time.
 
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