Re-Wiring a Microphone to use in an Oscilloscope ..#2

Thread Starter

vandy12

Joined Apr 8, 2021
5
Hi,
Could someone please offer some guidance on how to wire a microphone so that I can plug it into an oscilloscope. I know it can be done because I have seen it being used with an oscilloscope. So the input into the oscilloscope requires two banana plugs. Currently the microphone has a jack on the end. On the other end of the microphone lead is a 3 way female adaptor which the microphone plugs in to. I have seen people re-wire a stero jack to two banana plugs but can this be done for a microphone?

Thanks for any help offered.
No one has answered your question have they? Everything but. I would like to know this too. Can you connect a ball mic to an oscilloscope so you can see your voice patterns on the oscilloscope. The mic itself won't generate any power so you would have to have the mic, some kind of small amplifier, and then attach this all somehow to the oscilloscope. I would like to know the answer to this too. There are videos of this but they don't say how they set it up. I would also like to know if you run a sound wave thru and oscilloscope are there any oscilloscopes with an audio out that will let you listen to the sound wave? Now that would be cool. I don't think oscilloscopes in general are built to produce sound just to measure, but I would like to hear what 5 KHz sounds like for example.


Mod: link to old thread.E
https://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/...to-use-in-an-oscilloscope.140636/post-1184728
 
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Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,934
No one has answered your question have they? Everything but. I would like to know this too. Can you connect a ball mic to an oscilloscope so you can see your voice patterns on the oscilloscope. The mic itself won't generate any power so you would have to have the mic, some kind of small amplifier, and then attach this all somehow to the oscilloscope. I would like to know the answer to this too. There are videos of this but they don't say how they set it up. I would also like to know if you run a sound wave thru and oscilloscope are there any oscilloscopes with an audio out that will let you listen to the sound wave? Now that would be cool. I don't think oscilloscopes in general are built to produce sound just to measure, but I would like to hear what 5 KHz sounds like for example.
The thread is 3 years old. The thread starter was asked what type microphone he has? No direct answer. There are two basic types of microphone.

A Dynamic Microphone is a coil around a magnet and generates its own signal and yes, you can directly connect it to a scope. No amplifier is needed. For that matter you can directly connect a small speaker to a scope and yell into it and see your voice. You have a moving coil wrapped around a fixed magnet so as the voice coil moves it generates a small voltage. A condenser microphone or an electret microphone requires external bias and power to reproduce sound. In post number 5 the thread starter changed everything linking to a video which made little sense and nothing defined.

So yes, with the right microphone one can watch their voice both amplitude and frequency on a scope. Had the thread starter better defined what they had and what they wanted they would have gotten better help. Post #5 is nothing like post #1 which began the thread.

Ron
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
2,186
I'd say that was a cheap dynamic microphone of the type that comes with a home Karaoke setup, though the bloke's haircut suggests that the video might be from the days before Karaoke. (Either that, or he's just made it, and the haircut is due to Covid-19 lockdown)
I note that you can never see the entire microphone lead, so I reckon that it goes via a preamp. You get a clear view of the scope about about 3min30 sec, and it doesn't look as though the vertical is turned up full, because it would need to be on the 5mV setting to see anything directly out of a microphone, and I think the trace would look fuzzier.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
5,966
Old style record player - you can take a plastic cup and put the bottom against the needle and speak. It will act like a microphone and amplify your voice. It's not a very good mic - but neither is two soup cans and a long string, but it works.
 

Thread Starter

vandy12

Joined Apr 8, 2021
5
The thread is 3 years old. The thread starter was asked what type microphone he has? No direct answer. There are two basic types of microphone.

A Dynamic Microphone is a coil around a magnet and generates its own signal and yes, you can directly connect it to a scope. No amplifier is needed. For that matter you can directly connect a small speaker to a scope and yell into it and see your voice. You have a moving coil wrapped around a fixed magnet so as the voice coil moves it generates a small voltage. A condenser microphone or an electret microphone requires external bias and power to reproduce sound. In post number 5 the thread starter changed everything linking to a video which made little sense and nothing defined.

So yes, with the right microphone one can watch their voice both amplitude and frequency on a scope. Had the thread starter better defined what they had and what they wanted they would have gotten better help. Post #5 is nothing like post #1 which began the thread.

Ron
I have a general idea how a microphone works since I run a recording studio. Several people already went into great detail about the workings of a microphone which does not tell you which one to use or how to connect. Another vague answer. What is the right microphone? Can anyone name a specific brand and type that would be optimal for this? This is why I said a ball mic to narrow it down. No answer on how to connect. Put leads from Oscilloscope on the TRS jack? I did get a 1/4 TRS jack connected to a BNC and I think this should work OK but I'm new at using an oscilloscope and wanted to make sure it was connected and ground properly before hooking it up since connecting a guitar jack to an oscilloscope is uncommon. Just because someone didn't say the type of microphone someone on this site should be able to narrow it down from their experience. It is a simple clear question to me. How do you connect your microphone to an oscilloscope. No answer.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,152
I have a general idea how a microphone works since I run a recording studio. Several people already went into great detail about the workings of a microphone which does not tell you which one to use or how to connect. Another vague answer. What is the right microphone? Can anyone name a specific brand and type that would be optimal for this? This is why I said a ball mic to narrow it down. No answer on how to connect. Put leads from Oscilloscope on the TRS jack? I did get a 1/4 TRS jack connected to a BNC and I think this should work OK but I'm new at using an oscilloscope and wanted to make sure it was connected and ground properly before hooking it up since connecting a guitar jack to an oscilloscope is uncommon. Just because someone didn't say the type of microphone someone on this site should be able to narrow it down from their experience. It is a simple clear question to me. How do you connect your microphone to an oscilloscope. No answer.
So, you have a problem. You can’t understand the answers being given. Your actual goal is unclear. Why do you why to see the patterns on the scope? Do you know what those patterns are?

People are trying to help but you aren’t happy with the answers. They are not vague, they are trying to narrow down what you want. A “ball mic” isn’t a type of microphone. The element inside a microphone is not dependent on its appearance. We could guess about it. Maybe you mean something like a Blu condenser microphone, but that’s just a guess.

There is no ideal type or brand here, just a problem to be solved, and the problem is the thing.

You need to describe your problem not your half-thought-out solution if you are going to get help you find useful. You need to explain why you want to have a microphone hooked to an oscilloscope, what will you do with the result, what do you expect to learn from it, what problem are you solving?

If you just want to see patterns, there are many smartphone apps that can acts as simple audio range oscilloscopes. They use the phone’s mic and display a waveform. Maybe that’s enough for you, or even better. I don’t know because you haven’t explained why you are doing this so don’t expect the advisors here to read your mind.
 
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