Process of increasing Resistance

Thread Starter

Сергей999

Joined Jun 9, 2022
22
How can the process of increasing resistance from 1K to 100K be described on the physical level? The right current source creates a greater voltage drop on R2 than the left current source, because of this, the speed of passage of electrons is higher, which means that collisions with the atoms of the resistor are less, which means that the resistance is less, and it follows that the left current source sees, on the contrary, less resistance? How should this process be described correctly?
 

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Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
19,612
I'm not quite sure what you are trying to express, but I think you may be misinterpreting what is going on. You have chosen to plot the value of a voltage, V(a), divided by the current, I(I1), of a current source. The natural units of such an operation are Ohms (Ω). You cannot interpret this computed value as replacing or " standing in" for any of the actual resistances in the circuit. They remain unchanged. You should be able to determine all the relevant voltages and currents in this circuit and confirm that KVL and KCL are observed.
 

Thread Starter

Сергей999

Joined Jun 9, 2022
22
Instead of 1KOhms, the left current source sees 100KOhms, I can't understand how this happens at the physical level?
 
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WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
27,903
How can the process of increasing resistance from 1K to 100K be described on the physical level? The right current source creates a greater voltage drop on R2 than the left current source, because of this, the speed of passage of electrons is higher, which means that collisions with the atoms of the resistor are less, which means that the resistance is less, and it follows that the left current source sees, on the contrary, less resistance? How should this process be described correctly?
Imagine you have two voltage sources, V1 and V2, connected by a 100 Ω resistor between the two positive terminals (the two negative terminals are tied together).

Now imagine that someone is standing there adjusting V2 so that it always matches V1. What resistance does V1 see?

Well, no matter what V1 is set to, the current that flows out of it is always zero since the potential difference across the resistor is always 0 V. So it must see an infinite resistance, right?

But there's not need to resort to discussions of collisions with atoms in the resistor to understand what is going on.
 

BobaMosfet

Joined Jul 1, 2009
2,053
How can the process of increasing resistance from 1K to 100K be described on the physical level? The right current source creates a greater voltage drop on R2 than the left current source, because of this, the speed of passage of electrons is higher, which means that collisions with the atoms of the resistor are less, which means that the resistance is less, and it follows that the left current source sees, on the contrary, less resistance? How should this process be described correctly?
You need this:

Title: Understanding Basic Electronics, 1st Ed.
Publisher: The American Radio Relay League
ISBN: 0-87259-398-3
 
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