Printing circuits directly to paper with an ink jet

Thread Starter

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Joined May 22, 2019
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This article is 5 years old now but I've seen it for the first time today. Using a printer for circuit paths would be amazing enough but also printing the resisters, transistors, and capacitors is remarkable. The printing isn't limited to paper and this can be done in 3D also.

For you electronic engineers and techs, how useful and efficient would this be for designing and proving concepts?

https://www.fraunhofer.de/en/press/research-news/2014/may/circuits-sensors-direct-from-printer.html
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
22,145
I've been fallowing the development with interest. The big problem is the organic dyes are hygroscopic, and water from any source, such as humidity, ruins them. Most cellphones use organic LEDs.
 
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Thread Starter

Back to school

Joined May 22, 2019
106
I've been fallowing the development with interest. The big problem is the organic dyes are hygroscopic, and water from any source, such as humidity, ruins them. Most cellphones use organic LEDs.
That does throw a wrench in to the works but I'm sure that will be solved in time. From experience I know what a PITA locating vibration sensors on a car chassis is. It usually involves a lot of compromise with a known measure of circumstance accepted efficiency loss. A lot of expense goes in to testing factored in compensations. Tooling and machinery design is also a cost that could be mitigated with integrating the sensor as part of the component parts. With the advent of active vibration cancelling at specific frequencies and harmonics, printing the sensor directly on to the chassis would be a god send for the engineers. I'm just guessing but I'd bet the process is soon going to very prevalent.

I'm awed by the changes I've been able to witness in manufacturing processes.
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
22,145
Odd thing, during my working career we had areas where we had to have extra low humidity. It is measured by dew point when it is this low. On Earth, it is very hard to get a totally dry atmosphere, even in a pure nitrogen environment. A little moisture goes a very long ways. ways. Personally I would love wallpaper that doubled as a display.
 

Thread Starter

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Joined May 22, 2019
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I've done some more reading on this and they're printing circuits directly to skin and even printing new cells to wounded mice at the University of Minn. You'll get your wall paper along with clothes you can change as needed.
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
22,145
I already use a 3D printer at my local Maker Space. I have had a fairly debilitating stroke, and am stuck in a wheelchair. You want some interesting reading? Google Dallas Maker Space.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
9,699
I've done some more reading on this and they're printing circuits directly to skin and even printing new cells to wounded mice at the University of Minn. You'll get your wall paper along with clothes you can change as needed.
And a 3D printed heart: https://www.sciencealert.com/researchers-have-just-3d-printed-a-mini-heart-using-human-tissue

As for circuits, conductive organic inks have limitations. There is a method based on the Tollens reaction that deposits pure silver nanoparticles onto almost any substrate. Presumably they can even be soldered. It is currently being used to print circuits too.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,504
I already use a 3D printer at my local Maker Space. I have had a fairly debilitating stroke, and am stuck in a wheelchair. You want some interesting reading? Google Dallas Maker Space.
I just signed up for the Boston Maker Space. Awesome resource.
 

Thread Starter

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Joined May 22, 2019
106
How can anyone read something like a heart being printed and not be gob smacked? I'm a disabled vet also and things would be so much different had what's available today been available 35 to 40 years ago.
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
22,145
Yep One of the few things that might create some good from the gulf wars, is things like limb and organ regeneration. Like it or not war always advances medical technology.

My Dad was a vet. Thank you for your service.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
9,699
One of my daughters is involved in "regenerative" medicine. There are clinical studies today with retina and joint regeneration (both synovium and cartilage), as well as solid organ. Harvesting stem cells used to be difficult and somewhat dangerous as it required bone marrow cells. Today, they routinely generate stem cells from adipose (fat) tissue. That has reduced the risk significantly.

Considering the advances in the past 30 years, I believe in 20 years, if not sooner, solid organ transplants from donors (both cadaveric and living) will be history. So, get fat, you may need it someday. :)
 
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