Power to multiple electronic devices?

Thread Starter

Chevalier

Joined Mar 8, 2017
10
We all now face the issue of how to supply 230 volts to our electronic devices. A few years ago we had a TV, DVD etc and a simple 4 way extension lead was all we needed to supply the power they needed. Now however, we have lots more devices and often an 8 way extension lead is insufficient or too large. Can anyone please tell me if there is a method of supplying power to multiple devices that occupies a small physical space?
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
define multiple?
define "small physical space"?
define these "devices"?
Why is a regular power strip out of the question?
What specifically are you trying to do here?

If these are regular household devices and a power strip is not a feasible solution you have a big problem..
Any modification beyond simply plugging them into a listed power strip would violate their safety approvals and put you at risk for serious issues..
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,105
Can anyone please tell me if there is a method of supplying power to multiple devices that occupies a small physical space?
Yeah, arrange for your small physical space to have adequate mains voltage outlets or receptacles. Maybe for you 220 or 240 volts but for me they are 120 Volt. Running a pile of extension cords or extension leads as you call them is a poor practice and should be avoided.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

Chevalier

Joined Mar 8, 2017
10
Many thanks for your response. My issue (as described) is that 8 way extension leads are insufficient and occupy too much physical space. I need more than 8 ways in a smaller space. For example, is there such a thing as physically small power plugs (say 10 or 12 way) but each way capable of supplying no more than 1 amp at 230 volts - 12 times 1 amp = 12 amps (which is OK for the current 13 amp limit for UK standard plugs) with a small physical size - preferably smaller than the space needed for normal 8 way extension leads
 

Thread Starter

Chevalier

Joined Mar 8, 2017
10
Yeah, arrange for your small physical space to have adequate mains voltage outlets or receptacles. Maybe for you 220 or 240 volts but for me they are 120 Volt. Running a pile of extension cords or extension leads as you call them is a poor practice and should be avoided.

Ron
Many thanks for your reply Ron. My small physical space is fixed (it is in a brick built alcove adjacent to my TV) so I cannot adjust it's size to allow for multiple sockets outlets hidden in the space. I accept that I should have explained this earlier - as well as the fact that I am in the UK where the mains voltage is 230V. Please accept my apology. I also wish to avoid the alternative solution of running a 10 way conventional extension lead outside the hidden area (an eyesore not approved by my wife). I now sense that I am clutching at straws ;>). I acknowledge that two spade US 120 volt plugs are much smaller that the 3 pin UK plugs and so would work; unfortunately, they are not allowed in the UK.
 

ScottWang

Joined Aug 23, 2012
6,873
Many thanks for your response. My issue (as described) is that 8 way extension leads are insufficient and occupy too much physical space. I need more than 8 ways in a smaller space. For example, is there such a thing as physically small power plugs (say 10 or 12 way) but each way capable of supplying no more than 1 amp at 230 volts - 12 times 1 amp = 12 amps (which is OK for the current 13 amp limit for UK standard plugs) with a small physical size - preferably smaller than the space needed for normal 8 way extension leads
You might consider that separate two parts for the electronic devices, one part is light current and another is heavy current, using the independent switch is considering that you may using two devices at the same time, unless you build by yourself otherwise the products in the market probably they don't consider the size, space, these personal requirement all belongs to the DIY job.

Except the light current ad heavy current, you may also consider separate more parts and as three or four device just using one switch for the light current devices.
 

Thread Starter

Chevalier

Joined Mar 8, 2017
10
define multiple?
define "small physical space"?
define these "devices"?
Why is a regular power strip out of the question?
What specifically are you trying to do here?

If these are regular household devices and a power strip is not a feasible solution you have a big problem..
Any modification beyond simply plugging them into a listed power strip would violate their safety approvals and put you at risk for serious issues..
Sorry about the lack of precision. Posts 8 & 9 below add a liile more detail but the answers to your questions are:-
  1. The space available for the power supplies is 51cm wide, 43cm deep & 10cm tall
  2. The devices are the controller for my Panasonic TV, Sk HD Box, Pioneer Blue Ray Player, Yamaha amplifier, Cisco Wireless Router, WiII games machine, Amazon Firestick, & Logitech Harmony Elite Hub. I understand from comments by other users that current 8/10/12 way extension leads cause problems when the plugs are integrated with power supplies (mine are) because they block off other socket outlets.
  3. A regular 8 way extension lead with surge protection fed with cable from one end is too wide and a 10/12 way extension lead whilst shorter (two banks of 5 or 6) is too deep and, because it shows (when looking from a seated position) and not all sockets are useable - see 2 above.
  4. My objective is to find a compact extension lead that fits in the dimensions outlined in 1 above where at least 8 sockets are useable (i.e. nothing blocked off becasue the power supply is built into the plug)
I accept that my requirements may well be unachievable but I live in hope. If not, I shall have to tackle the immensly more difficult task of persuading my wife to accept a little clutter ;>)
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
You are SOL...
Too much stuff in too little space.. nothing you can do about that but make more space..
Either you can find a power strip (extension lead I guess when outside of the US).. that will work.. Or you can't... Plain and simple..
 

Thread Starter

Chevalier

Joined Mar 8, 2017
10
You might consider that separate two parts for the electronic devices, one part is light current and another is heavy current, using the independent switch is considering that you may using two devices at the same time, unless you build by yourself otherwise the products in the market probably they don't consider the size, space, these personal requirement all belongs to the DIY job.

Except the light current ad heavy current, you may also consider separate more parts and as three or four device just using one switch for the light current devices.
Thank you for your response. None of my devices consumes more than 1 amp maximum at 230 volts (I have measured each) so, in my opinion, they are all light current. That is why I consider that ALL are OK from a single 13 amp extension lead because the aggregate of the maximum current draw for each device is less than 13 amps (I have measured the aggregate current supplied to the existing devices and the peak current is less than 11 amps).
 
Last edited:

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,105
Well all things considered while I am unaware of easy UK solutions on this side of the pond we do have surface mount receptacles which are a box which mounts to a wall. They look like this. The wire is run along the wall in a protective cover. Possible something along those lines for UK? While extension cords should not be a permanent solution if they must be used just make sure the ampacity of the line is great enough for any loads it might see in use. For example here in the US the typical circuit breakers are for 20 Amp service with some 15 Amp service. The wiring for such outlets is AWG 20 (2.053mm). So when using extension cords just try to make sure the wire gauge is adequate for any load you may have. Unfortunately your options are few when new lines can't be added to a space.

Ron
 
This time, I can only speak for the US.

In the US, we do have stacking pigtails. A line of plugs that stack (plug into one another) with a 10 cm length with a socket at the end.

My network area in the house has two power squids. https://www.amazon.com/Accell-D080B-007K-R-PowerSquid-Outlet-Multiplier/dp/B004LZ5XMU or similar. Everything is wall warts and they just LOVE falling out of the wall.

We have various versions of wiremold: e.g. http://www.globalindustrial.com/p/work-benches/power-strips/surge-protectors/ul2065bd-multi-outlet-power-unit-125v-15a-72l-24-outlets-15-cord

There's all sorts of ducting that can be used to hide wires.

Maybe, there's a custom solution. A lot of devices are DC and that's where stuff really gets messy. We have outlets that combine USB charging and AC.

If you really had to, you could "roll your own".

Here's http://www.stayonline.com/custom-stringers.aspx an odd one.

and another idea: http://www.stayonline.com/searchresult.aspx?categoryid=2371

Nothing is likely going to be what you need unfortunately. If you have a lot of DC stuff (wall warts), it may be possible to engineer something smaller.

There's the male version of the IEC outlet which can be 120-240 that could be smaller. I know the normal plugs have fuses in the uk.

Just the wires themselves end up taking up a lot of space.

I really can't be much helpful being on the opposite end of the pond. We do have these "outlet multiplier" which can take the normal duplex and turn it into six. The six won't accept 6 large plugs though.
 

Thread Starter

Chevalier

Joined Mar 8, 2017
10
This time, I can only speak for the US.

In the US, we do have stacking pigtails. A line of plugs that stack (plug into one another) with a 10 cm length with a socket at the end.

My network area in the house has two power squids. https://www.amazon.com/Accell-D080B-007K-R-PowerSquid-Outlet-Multiplier/dp/B004LZ5XMU or similar. Everything is wall warts and they just LOVE falling out of the wall.

We have various versions of wiremold: e.g. http://www.globalindustrial.com/p/work-benches/power-strips/surge-protectors/ul2065bd-multi-outlet-power-unit-125v-15a-72l-24-outlets-15-cord

There's all sorts of ducting that can be used to hide wires.

Maybe, there's a custom solution. A lot of devices are DC and that's where stuff really gets messy. We have outlets that combine USB charging and AC.

If you really had to, you could "roll your own".

Here's http://www.stayonline.com/custom-stringers.aspx an odd one.

and another idea: http://www.stayonline.com/searchresult.aspx?categoryid=2371

Nothing is likely going to be what you need unfortunately. If you have a lot of DC stuff (wall warts), it may be possible to engineer something smaller.

There's the male version of the IEC outlet which can be 120-240 that could be smaller. I know the normal plugs have fuses in the uk.

Just the wires themselves end up taking up a lot of space.

I really can't be much helpful being on the opposite end of the pond. We do have these "outlet multiplier" which can take the normal duplex and turn it into six. The six won't accept 6 large plugs though.
This is the great advantage of discussion groups such as this. Someone (thankfully you) comes up with a thought that triggers a posible solution. The "stacking pigtails" option is new to me but after looking at your URL I realised that is my solution. I simply "make my own" pigtails using UK standards and hang the pigtail down the back of the shelves which suppot all of my devices. I then position each outlet directly at the back of each device and that minimises the length of the power leads and makes for a very tidy arrangement which will please my wife ;>)

Many thanks for a great idea which I am convinced will solve my problem. YOU ARE A STAR!!!
 

Thread Starter

Chevalier

Joined Mar 8, 2017
10
You are SOL...
Too much stuff in too little space.. nothing you can do about that but make more space..
Either you can find a power strip (extension lead I guess when outside of the US).. that will work.. Or you can't... Plain and simple..
How right you are. The space was enough when it was built 9 years ago but with passing time more and more desireable (must have) devices arrive and I try to fit them in. Unfortunately, I did not recognise that there was another way to solve my problem until post 15 arrived. Only then did I realise that I simply hang pigtails down the back of the shelves which support my devices - naturally I will ensure that they are correctly supported to the back unseen wall.
 

Ed Bray

Joined Feb 1, 2017
46
IEC connectors are the way to go, you can get multiple IEC outlet boxes I gave away a small 12 port box just recently (12 port here, mine was in two rows of 6, http://cpc.farnell.com/powerdata-technologies/h15uiec-12/horizontal-iec-pdu-1-5u-12-way/dp/PL09689 ) , (cheaper one here: http://cpc.farnell.com/lms-data/pdu-8ws-h-iec-uk/8-way-horiz-iec13-10a-sw-pdu-uk/dp/EN84515 )you would need to change the 13Amp plugs on some of your items for IEC connectors and you would need to get a few IEC to 13amp sockets for your wallwarts http://cpc.farnell.com/pro-power/0428-1g-1m/iec-c14-plug-to-13a-socket-black/dp/PL15015, but it is certainly doable and not really that big a job. If you need more than eight you can do it with double connectors like this: http://cpc.farnell.com/unbranded/pe-00080/splitter-iec-one-into-two/dp/PL13215 or get a smaller block of say 6 and have six double connectors.
 

Thread Starter

Chevalier

Joined Mar 8, 2017
10
IEC connectors are the way to go, you can get multiple IEC outlet boxes I gave away a small 12 port box just recently (12 port here, mine was in two rows of 6, http://cpc.farnell.com/powerdata-technologies/h15uiec-12/horizontal-iec-pdu-1-5u-12-way/dp/PL09689 ) , (cheaper one here: http://cpc.farnell.com/lms-data/pdu-8ws-h-iec-uk/8-way-horiz-iec13-10a-sw-pdu-uk/dp/EN84515 )you would need to change the 13Amp plugs on some of your items for IEC connectors and you would need to get a few IEC to 13amp sockets for your wallwarts http://cpc.farnell.com/pro-power/0428-1g-1m/iec-c14-plug-to-13a-socket-black/dp/PL15015, but it is certainly doable and not really that big a job. If you need more than eight you can do it with double connectors like this: http://cpc.farnell.com/unbranded/pe-00080/splitter-iec-one-into-two/dp/PL13215 or get a smaller block of say 6 and have six double connectors.
They do indeed look to be what I am after and I will order the kit ASAP. Many thanks for your assistance.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
9,972
Top