Power Source AC240V and Appliance AC220V

Thread Starter

Jonathan Foong

Joined Mar 13, 2021
39
I am not sure about this issue for a very long time need to understand in-depth electrically the complications if any.

Can I operate my appliances of AC220V to work from the power source of AC240V or vice versa, if yes, what is the electrical effect (performance) in terms of power/wattage consumption or other consideration?

Thank you.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
1,929
It depends on the type of Appliance.
Electronics generally don't care at all.
Heat-Producing-Appliances, such as, Toaster, Hot-Plate, Hair-Dryer, will simply get slightly hotter.
Motors will get slightly hotter than usual, and may run slightly faster.
Certain types of Motors could have an increased tendency to over-heat.

This is what is known as a "nominal" Voltage, it is not regulated.
Do worry about it too much.

Motors over ~1-Horsepower should be paid particular attention,
and tested for Current vs Name-Plate-Specifications when operating under their normal Load.
.
.
.
 

Sensacell

Joined Jun 19, 2012
2,985
The voltage difference is ~ 10% = not a big issue.

The frequency difference however is much more of a problem for motors, transformers, and some electronics that care about the frequency.
For resistive heating devices- the frequency is a non-issue.
 

Thread Starter

Jonathan Foong

Joined Mar 13, 2021
39
It depends on the type of Appliance.
Electronics generally don't care at all.
Heat-Producing-Appliances, such as, Toaster, Hot-Plate, Hair-Dryer, will simply get slightly hotter.
Motors will get slightly hotter than usual, and may run slightly faster.
Certain types of Motors could have an increased tendency to over-heat.

This is what is known as a "nominal" Voltage, it is not regulated.
Do worry about it too much.

Motors over ~1-Horsepower should be paid particular attention,
and tested for Current vs Name-Plate-Specifications when operating under their normal Load.
.
.
.
Good day to you,

Thank you very much for your detailed reply, this makes me clear my doubt, and should bear in mind that direct AC operation appliances should be aware of their power consumption rating for this situation especially those with higher power ratings.

Another question I missed out on is, how about the power source frequency is 60Hz, and the appliance is rated at 50Hz? Would it also be another factor that needs to take note of?

Thank you again.
 

Thread Starter

Jonathan Foong

Joined Mar 13, 2021
39
The voltage difference is ~ 10% = not a big issue.

The frequency difference however is much more of a problem for motors, transformers, and some electronics that care about the frequency.
For resistive heating devices- the frequency is a non-issue.
Hi Sensacell,

Thank you very much for your reply on both of my doubts make me further understand these issues and awareness.

Wish you a good day!
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
1,929
Good day to you,

Thank you very much for your detailed reply, this makes me clear my doubt, and should bear in mind that direct AC operation appliances should be aware of their power consumption rating for this situation especially those with higher power ratings.

Another question I missed out on is, how about the power source frequency is 60Hz, and the appliance is rated at 50Hz? Would it also be another factor that needs to take note of?

Thank you again.
Sensacell already provided a pretty good answer .......

Appliances that are clearly marked "50/60hz" are the
only Appliances that are completely unaffected by Frequency.

Synchronous-Motors, and any Appliance with a Transformer,
should ONLY be used at their Name-Plate-Rated-Frequency.
This includes some, but not all, Wall-Wort-Power-Supplies.

Brushed, or "Series-Wound" Motors don't care about the Frequency very much.

"Heating" type Appliances generally don't care about the Frequency, but,
some small "Space-Heaters" may have a Synchronous-Fan-Motor that
may burn-up with the wrong Frequency.
Hair-Dryers have a Brushed-Series-Wound Motor that doesn't care about Frequency.
.
.
.
 

Thread Starter

Jonathan Foong

Joined Mar 13, 2021
39
Sensacell already provided a pretty good answer .......

Appliances that are clearly marked "50/60hz" are the
only Appliances that are completely unaffected by Frequency.

Synchronous-Motors, and any Appliance with a Transformer,
should ONLY be used at their Name-Plate-Rated-Frequency.
This includes some, but not all, Wall-Wort-Power-Supplies.

Brushed, or "Series-Wound" Motors don't care about the Frequency very much.

"Heating" type Appliances generally don't care about the Frequency, but,
some small "Space-Heaters" may have a Synchronous-Fan-Motor that
may burn-up with the wrong Frequency.
Hair-Dryers have a Brushed-Series-Wound Motor that doesn't care about Frequency.
.
.
.
Hi,

Definitely, it is awesome to understand so much about power source and appliances issues from you.

Thank you again.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
4,864
Once upon a time the voltage in Britain was 240V ±6%, and the voltage in continental Europe was 220V±6%, then the EU “unified” the voltages, and they all became 230V, 230V+10%-6% in Britain, and 230V+6%-10% in continental Europe.
Actually, nothing whatsoever changed.
Standards require that the product can cope with 230V±10%. The only product that remained different was filament lamps, because the life varies inversely as the twelfth power of voltage, 240V will reduce the life of a 220V lamp by 65%.
If your product complies with a standard based on IEC 60335 then it should be compatible with both Voltages.
 

Thread Starter

Jonathan Foong

Joined Mar 13, 2021
39
Once upon a time the voltage in Britain was 240V ±6%, and the voltage in continental Europe was 220V±6%, then the EU “unified” the voltages, and they all became 230V, 230V+10%-6% in Britain, and 230V+6%-10% in continental Europe.
Actually, nothing whatsoever changed.
Standards require that the product can cope with 230V±10%. The only product that remained different was filament lamps, because the life varies inversely as the twelfth power of voltage, 240V will reduce the life of a 220V lamp by 65%.
If your product complies with a standard based on IEC 60335 then it should be compatible with both Voltages.
Noted and thank you for your practical experience sharing.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
25,010
If using motorized equipment, you will be safer going from 50Hz to 60Hz, just the motor RPM will differ (higher RPM) for induction motors.
Although you may still be OK for the smaller motors when ran on 50hz in place of 60hz.
In the days of record players, often people would import them on moving from country to country, different motor sized pulleys were available in order to adapt them for use on the two frequencies
 

Thread Starter

Jonathan Foong

Joined Mar 13, 2021
39
If using motorized equipment, you will be safer going from 50Hz to 60Hz, just the motor RPM will differ (higher RPM) for induction motors.
Although you may still be OK for the smaller motors when ran on 50hz in place of 60hz.
In the days of record players, often people would import them on moving from country to country, different motor sized pulleys were available in order to adapt them for use on the two frequencies
Noted and Thank you for your additional awareness.
 

ci139

Joined Jul 11, 2016
1,799
as far as i get there're three nearby voltage specs 220V 230V and 240V
if you search the internet the 230V pops up most frequently also my area service provider specifies 230V
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country -- you can match your location to the manufacturer of your appliance or it's intended market (much likely if you bought it from a local dealer it's more likely to be safe to use at your grid)
 

Thread Starter

Jonathan Foong

Joined Mar 13, 2021
39
as far as i get there're three nearby voltage specs 220V 230V and 240V
if you search the internet the 230V pops up most frequently also my area service provider specifies 230V
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country -- you can match your location to the manufacturer of your appliance or it's intended market (much likely if you bought it from a local dealer it's more likely to be safe to use at your grid)
Noted and thanks for the linked information
 
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