Phasers of inductors question

Thread Starter

mbferguson

Joined Apr 23, 2017
94
I'm wondering how he goes from 120+3jw on the denominator to 120+j86.71

I tried figuring out mathematically to get that number but couldn't get it... is it something to do with polar coordinates?
 

Attachments

Thread Starter

mbferguson

Joined Apr 23, 2017
94
Hello again, I have another question. In this problem towards the bottom right of the page, he goes from "j20.36 + 88.10<-84.95" to "0 + j20.36". I'm assuming that the 88.10 cancels out somehow since the degree is negative, but I'd like some clarification on why that is. Also, I have no idea how he goes to the next step from that, where he says "7.755 -j87.76 / 7.755 - j67.40"

Thanks
 

Attachments

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
12,493
Hello again, I have another question. In this problem towards the bottom right of the page, he goes from "j20.36 + 88.10<-84.95" to "0 + j20.36". I'm assuming that the 88.10 cancels out somehow since the degree is negative, but I'd like some clarification on why that is. Also, I have no idea how he goes to the next step from that, where he says "7.755 -j87.76 / 7.755 - j67.40"

Thanks
The horizontal line indicates that he is adding two complex quantities together. Since they are in different notations, he has to convert the polar representation of to a rectangular one. Then he can add two rectangular quantities together, and then convert back to polar. I disagree on this digits, but the method is sound.

I get 7.757 - j67.371 =67.817 ∠ -83.432°
 
Top