Peltier (Tec) cooler questions?

Thread Starter

Cyrus Mingley

Joined Apr 18, 2020
92
Can I sequence 2 12v peltier cooler plates to be used with a 24v supply? My guess is yes, but why not check. Also, is it more efficient to use a few larger rated coolers, or a bunch of lower ones? I assume lower ones because heat removal will be easier, but the efficiency might not be the greatest. Looking for a balance. Finally, how good are peltiers at cooling water, I’m cooling around 20 oz of water, maybe more, which needs to be in the 40-50 degree Fahrenheit zone, or lower if easily doable, with a moderate heat load.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
21,400
1) You can wire TEC (thermo-electric coolers) in series or parallel to suit your need.

2) One large TEC vs many small ones does not matter. What matters is the thermal dissipation - see (4) + (5) below.

3) Yes, TECs are excellent for cooling water. Just don't let the water get into the TEC elements.

4) What is important is the temperature difference between the hot side and the cold side. This will dramatically affect the efficiency. Remember, a TEC is a heat pump. It moves thermal energy from one side to the other. The ambient temperature is very important. If the surrounding air is already at 90°F and you are trying to cool water to 40°F, that is a 50°F difference which is a heavy load for any TEC. You can stack up multiple TECs so that each TEC sees a fraction of the temperature difference.

5) Which ever way you do it, it is vital that you remove the heat from the hot side by the best means available - conduction (large heat sinks or water cooling coils), convection (fans), radiation (lots of black painted fins - the least effective method). The hot side will get HOT, very HOT!!! If you do no remove the heat the TEC will quickly die.

6) What do you mean by a "moderate heat load"?
 

Thread Starter

Cyrus Mingley

Joined Apr 18, 2020
92
1) You can wire TEC (thermo-electric coolers) in series or parallel to suit your need.

2) One large TEC vs many small ones does not matter. What matters is the thermal dissipation - see (4) + (5) below.

3) Yes, TECs are excellent for cooling water. Just don't let the water get into the TEC elements.

4) What is important is the temperature difference between the hot side and the cold side. This will dramatically affect the efficiency. Remember, a TEC is a heat pump. It moves thermal energy from one side to the other. The ambient temperature is very important. If the surrounding air is already at 90°F and you are trying to cool water to 40°F, that is a 50°F difference which is a heavy load for any TEC. You can stack up multiple TECs so that each TEC sees a fraction of the temperature difference.

5) Which ever way you do it, it is vital that you remove the heat from the hot side by the best means available - conduction (large heat sinks or water cooling coils), convection (fans), radiation (lots of black painted fins - the least effective method). The hot side will get HOT, very HOT!!! If you do no remove the heat the TEC will quickly die.

6) What do you mean by a "moderate heat load"?
Cool, thanks. Moderate load is a steam condenser, primarily for a steam engine for-fun model, but also for distilling water for plants. (We have hard water, really really hard water. Like a humidifier has sheets of minerals after 4 or so gallons.) and also for water within water cooling mechanisms, because, minerals. What is a “good” load for a Tec, I’ve seen conflicting information, and the Tecs I’m looking at are cheap cheap Chinese made tecs, the reason I’m using tecs is the price. And also the size, but you get the idea. Anyways what is the kill range for heat? Somewhere around 100c?
 
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