Octave pedal boosting bass instead of dividing wave

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by rfpd, Jul 26, 2017.

  1. rfpd

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 6, 2016
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    I managed to 'clean' the square wave, but after the hype of it working, only now I figured out it was just boosting the bass... I mean it makes sense, since it has three low pass filters with a cutoff frequency of 159 Hz. I mean, before the filters I get a fuzzy sound, so I think it's not bypassing it. Can someone tell me how's this happening?

    btw the flip flop is powered by 9V and the first opamp is powered and biased with 9 V aswell, just used 10V because there isn't a 9V opamp in the simulator.

    upload_2017-7-27_4-36-23.png
     
  2. rfpd

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 6, 2016
    101
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    In the flip flop I only connected Vcc, Vss, and the connections made in the schematic. I didn't connect the rest to ground, could that have anything to do with it?
     
  3. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    The 4013 is a CMOS circuit. You must NEVER leave unused inputs of CMOS circuits floating (unconnected), or you can get weird results.
     
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  4. rfpd

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 6, 2016
    101
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    Yeah I think that was it, I used this schematic now, but after the filters I still get some squary noise, I mean if I play carefully I don't hear it as much (still bothers though), isn't there a way to filter it?

    upload_2017-7-27_16-50-53.png
     
  5. rfpd

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 6, 2016
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    Btw should I connect everything else to ground aswell? Like Q1 and -Q1 (not being used, only Q2 and -Q2)?
     
  6. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    How would you like it if someone stuck a rag in your mouth? That is what you are doing if you ground Q1 and /Q1.
    Never connect output pins to GND or Vcc, or Vss or Vdd.
     
  7. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    Connecting an output to ground is a bit like plugging a shorting bar into a mains socket! Sparks will fly, or the magic smoke will escape.
     
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