Needing help with unknown warning symbol, or direction.

Thread Starter

static-jumper

Joined Dec 28, 2018
11
Hi there


A guy was doing some work at our building installing a power shower, and he's handmade what looks like a warning sign, in front of the isolator, like below:


https://i.ibb.co/Sv6DGfv/drawisland.png


can anyone tell me about this symbol?

does anyone recognise it? what does it mean? and is there a name for this type of electrical inner-industry short-hand?
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
19,277
Looks like he has located where he wants to punch some holes or make a cutout in the wall.
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,815
Post your actual image and not a link. Mr Chips is a lot more brave than most clicking on an unknown link from an unknown user. You won't catch me clicking on it. You can paste an image right into the editor (you need to be in advanced if you are editing an old post). And read my signature! ;)
 

Thread Starter

static-jumper

Joined Dec 28, 2018
11
the symbol he marked the circuit with is this:


is there a universal set of markings used by electricians?
there's a few different ones dotted about, the guy who leaves them is an electrical engineer
 

Thread Starter

static-jumper

Joined Dec 28, 2018
11
I think you need to ask the guy. Looks like some random markings to me.

I wanted to ask him but he's no longer here anymore. :(

it was put in front of an isolator, after a power shower was hooked up using it.
I saw the same marking on something else too in a different building; and I've long since seen engineers leave little notes for each other, think it's to point out obvious dangers, flaws, or specific set-ups - so any engineer can pick up where the other left off, or have their attention drawn to specific risks within a system.


the ironing board shaped symbol looks similar to the "universal language" symbol on wikipedia. not sure if that's relevant though.

I wondered if it meant something like "ground disconnected", "circuit seperate to fuse box and ground" or "exposed wires on isolator"

either way he made a real effort to mark this up for the next person to work on it.
would really like to know more.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,874
IT is not an electrical symbol, but probably an architectural symbol that does have a meaning.
But I am unclear as to what you are meaning by "isolator" and "Power shower", and so I can't even guess about the meaning.
 

strantor

Joined Oct 3, 2010
5,033
Closest match in my collection of known runes comes from the P&ID symbol bucket, of which this would roughly translate to "there is a knife gate pilot operated diaphragm inside the wall." But that's not a real thing.

It is probably gibberish that the author knew nobody would be able to make sense of (because there is no sense to be made of it), therefore anyone who came across it wouldn't be able to immediately dismiss it out of familiarity. If instead it said "do not use this because the temperature set point needs adjustment and you might get burned" then some people might still put their hand in it just to see how hot it is. But upon seeing this nonsensical symbol it could mean anything; high voltage, a trap door above a pit of vipers, the need for drywall texture, a leaky valve. Nobody knows so nobody encroaches.
 

Thread Starter

static-jumper

Joined Dec 28, 2018
11
IT is not an electrical symbol, but probably an architectural symbol that does have a meaning.
But I am unclear as to what you are meaning by "isolator" and "Power shower", and so I can't even guess about the meaning.
a power shower is an electric shower... and isolator is an electrical device that seperates two frequencies using microwaves.
 

Thread Starter

static-jumper

Joined Dec 28, 2018
11
Closest match in my collection of known runes comes from the P&ID symbol bucket, of which this would roughly translate to "there is a knife gate pilot operated diaphragm inside the wall." But that's not a real thing.
I think you're on to something, he was not a plumber, but an electrical engineer.
so the symbols are electrical symbols.

i think it means "there is something running through a hole above the ceiling" and the vertical line on the side means "in this direction"

which would make sense since he ran four wires off the isolator, and ran them through a hatch in the lift and along to where the bathroom was.
his other symbols all seem to make sense in line with what he's done
just wasn't sure on this one...
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,874
a power shower is an electric shower... and isolator is an electrical device that seperates two frequencies using microwaves.
I am quite aware of microwave isolators, but that term would not be correct in this instance. I am suspecting that it is being used with an entirely different meaning here. In this instance it may refer to a disconnect switch or an isolation transformer, two other devices that might also be called isolators. And a "power shower" might be what we call an "emergency wash station", a device often found where damaging chemicals are used, often thyey are right next to emergency eyewash stations. So it is still a case of local jargon causing confusion.
 

Thread Starter

static-jumper

Joined Dec 28, 2018
11
I am quite aware of microwave isolators, but that term would not be correct in this instance. I am suspecting that it is being used with an entirely different meaning here. In this instance it may refer to a disconnect switch or an isolation transformer, two other devices that might also be called isolators. And a "power shower" might be what we call an "emergency wash station", a device often found where damaging chemicals are used, often thyey are right next to emergency eyewash stations. So it is still a case of local jargon causing confusion.

it's just a an electric shower you take a shower under. i think you're looking too much into it.

what's the difference between an isolator and an isolation transformer?
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
3,874
it's just a an electric shower you take a shower under. i think you're looking too much into it.

what's the difference between an isolator and an isolation transformer?
An isolator could be as simple as a switch that opens all of the power connection circuits. An isolation transformer provides a means of passing power or signals through while not having any electrical connection, but it does not provide any means of switching off. That is why I prefer the term "disconnect" or "disconnect switch", since the meaning is far more obvious.
Since I have no clue about "your building" it could be a factory or an industrial research center or even a chemistry laboratory. Those buildings often have emergency systems because accidents do happen. If you mean a residence building then that is different. My mind reading ability is very poor and so I am dependent on folks to provide enough information to allow for a reasonable explanation.
 

Thread Starter

static-jumper

Joined Dec 28, 2018
11
Since I have no clue about "your building" it could be a factory or an industrial research center or even a chemistry laboratory. Those buildings often have emergency systems because accidents do happen. If you mean a residence building then that is different. My mind reading ability is very poor and so I am dependent on folks to provide enough information to allow for a reasonable explanation.
Thanks for reply.
It's a factory, and I only know it as an isolator. It was connected to a lift, and now has been rewired to provide power to an electric shower, as the lifts are no longer being used.

The markings put on it, i'm guessing, were to explain what had been done to it in case the next electrician comes along and wants to change the set-up/remove the showers, or re-engage the lift without having to go around spending hours checking what had been done.
by that logic it must be some form of universal symbol.
Or it could just be an interpretation of a "danger of death" symbol.

As for your mind reading ability, I am wearing a telepathic deflector, which is why you are unable to read my mind.
I have tried to read your statements as questions, then provided information where I could.

My real interest here is where I might find generic electrical symbols?
I've noticed when electricians change things they tend to mark what they've done,
but never been able to find much information or resource on this on-line.
Just seems something people pick-up as opposed to learn - so each person could just use their own style, like handwritting.

Any electrical versions of those P&ID symbols would be really helpful.
Just trying to pick up something useful at work is all..
 
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