Need suggestion - IP rating for a connector is defined only for male connector or with mating female connector?

Thread Starter

Ranjana Meena

Joined Oct 29, 2020
3
Hello All,

I am looking for help to understand the IP rating criteria for connectors. I am using a 35 pin TE connector in the IoT device(Reference link : https://www.te.com/global-en/product-776231-2.html), I need to perform IP67 test for the IoT device and am confused if it has to be done with the mating connector.
The last IP test was failed as it was done only with the male connector in place.
Please let me know if any of you have experience or knowledge in this regard.

Thank you in advance.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,515
Welcome to AAC,

I am definitely not an expert on such testing. However, it appears that if the connector is to the outside from a box, testing may be without the mating connector installed. Adding the connector would then seem to involve a separate test.

https://www.cuidevices.com/blog/the-basics-of-ip-ratings-and-ip-rated-connectors

Some applications may require the combination of a connector and plug that are sealed when mated. These are often needed for industrial cable-to-cable connections used to link controllers or modules in environments where penetrating dust or moisture can disrupt signals, corrode contacts, or damage components such as transmitters or power sources. These fully sealed cable connections can resist water ingress even if exposed to high-pressure water – for example if nearby equipment is cleaned with a pressure washer – or if they become fully immersed.<snip image>

On the other hand, where a device has external ports such as a micro USB port, headphone socket, or dc power input, IP rated connectors may be needed to protect internal circuitry when no external cables or equipment are connected.
 

Thread Starter

Ranjana Meena

Joined Oct 29, 2020
3
Welcome to AAC,

I am definitely not an expert on such testing. However, it appears that if the connector is to the outside from a box, testing may be without the mating connector installed. Adding the connector would then seem to involve a separate test.

https://www.cuidevices.com/blog/the-basics-of-ip-ratings-and-ip-rated-connectors
Hello @jpanhalt,

Thank you for the quick response. I think I should provide more clarity on the device housing and use case. The IoT device has a 35 pin connector coming out to which a mating 35 pin connector joins along with the harness. This device is planned to be used for 2 wheeler keyless fleet in India.
So, the use case for the device would always be with a mating connector and harness except for edge cases where someone tries to vandalize the setup.

From above information I feel that IP test should be conducted with the mating connector. I would like to know if you have a different thought process.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,515
From above information I feel that IP test should be conducted with the mating connector. I would like to know if you have a different thought process.
I agree. That is how I interpret the description in the link. It seems the way to get an IP rating most relevant to how the product will be used.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,936
I don't have experience with the IP testing, but logic would tell me that if the connector is part of the module that is to be rated (if the connector is expected to stay dry inside) then both sides must be mated for meaningful test results.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,515
I suspect the inline plug will be the type with a rubber seal for the connector on the "box" (green here) and individual or group seals (blue in attached picture) for the wires on the plug.

1604062292948.png

That snippet is just one example that happens to be for an in-line cable rather than cable to box. A variety of male and female, as well as non-gendered contacts are available.
 
Most connectors' IP rating it when they are mated. They will specifically say 'unmated' if they are also tested that way. The DEUTSCH DT series I believe is IP69 when unmated.
 
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