Mechanical Switch for multipe ssd drives

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
92
So This project is kind of interesting. I am having a little trouble sourcing a good switch though I found another similar project I can't seem to relocate and it uses a single switch from mouser, I think sold by NHK, that went out of production. Just curious if the brain trust here has ever done similar. I thought of a simple PCB to do it. However examples I have seen on amazon all use many different solutions. Some seem to use capacitors others seem to use 555's best I can tell. From what I have seen in other DIY projects you don't need any of that crap just wire it up maybe a more skilled circuit designer can tell me why all diamonds and pearls on the professional 5 HDD/SSD switches. For my need thought I just want tot find a good switch that will handle all of the power or data lines either way.

https://lifehacker.com/build-your-own-sata-switch-5160614
 
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Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
92
Finally dug up the one I want to emulate. The reason I am asking in this forum about this project is that I want to make a few changes. For one I think that it makes little sense to get rid of the 3.3v when I can just splice the grounds together. The other question I have is does the brain trust here know where I can just find a 5 PDT switch switch that dose not cost a ton. Everything on mouser is like 50$ a switch. Big difference from 10$. Also the switch he used went obsolete I am assuming it is some miner change because it looks one for one. Maybe some-one who loves looking at data sheets can tell me what is different in the new version.

http://www.highonsolder.com/hardware/dual-boot-pc-w-toggle-switch/
 

Marcus2012

Joined Feb 22, 2015
375
Hi

I'm in the UK here and I have been searching for a 5P switch but they are inherently expensive unfortunately. Would you consider using a preassembled 3.5" (or 5.25") drive selector? This is a simple and effective one on my regional ebay, it just uses switches (DPDT by the looks of it) and smoothing caps.

HDD Power Control Switch Hard Drive Selector SATA

Doesn't have the 3.3V by the looks of it but you don't need it anyway as most drives convert 5>3.3 on board. But if in doubt look on the drive sticker and it should say current draw on the voltage rails it uses.

Sorry I couldn't be more help

:)
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
92
Hi

I'm in the UK here and I have been searching for a 5P switch but they are inherently expensive unfortunately. Would you consider using a preassembled 3.5" (or 5.25") drive selector? This is a simple and effective one on my regional ebay, it just uses switches (DPDT by the looks of it) and smoothing caps.

HDD Power Control Switch Hard Drive Selector SATA

Doesn't have the 3.3V by the looks of it but you don't need it anyway as most drives convert 5>3.3 on board. But if in doubt look on the drive sticker and it should say current draw on the voltage rails it uses.

Sorry I couldn't be more help

:)

Ive noticed these my self and I see them as a great solution just over kill for my needs. More cost effective though after shipping. Kills it as a project though eh. An that is kinda the point. One man and his tools and all that. On the other hand that is why I was thinking of maybe getting a PCB printed and then doing a stepped down version of the same thing as a secondary proto typing project.
 

Marcus2012

Joined Feb 22, 2015
375
Yeah it was just the price that made it appealling but as you said you could just copy the design and make it more bespoke for your case, I doubt you'd even need the caps unless you'd be hot plugging devices. Using DPDT switches for each devices would signifantly lower design costs and opens up a much wider ranges of switches for you to use (rocker, toggle, PCB latching, switch guards, switch lighting etc.). The SATA crimps/connectors you can get easily enough, or just splice used SATA leads. :cool:

Btw what are the 5 Circuits you need to switch though, are they all devices? You'd only need to switch power not data.

EDIT you don't need to switch ground btw it can be common, just the 5 & 12V that would need switching.
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
92
Btw what are the 5 Circuits you need to switch though, are they all devices? You'd only need to switch power not data.

EDIT you don't need to switch ground btw it can be common, just the 5 & 12V that would need switching.

I'm Sorry i said circuits not wires. I'll go back and make the correction. I don't know if you looked at the second link i dropped but like you said I can use a common ground. The switch that I just ordered off of mouser and actually came today has four hookups. An there are five wires in the sata power lines 12v, 5v, 3v, & two grounds. That was the tree I was barking up Ill just use a common ground in the switch then split them when reconnecting it once more. Shouldn't be a big deal right. Unless someone knows something about computer power supply's I don't.

just looking at the switch I am assuming the power in is in the middle and then I can direct left or right by flipping the switch kinda cool.
 

Marcus2012

Joined Feb 22, 2015
375
Hey again

Sorry for the late reply, but sounds like you've got this covered now :cool:

Should be all good to go, you're right that usually the common terminal on double throws are the centre but probably worth doing a continuity check with a meter if possible. As long as you converge the grounds and then diverge them (in the switch) it should be fine if the switch current rating is adequate (check the device labels). The only reason there are two is that the grounds are carrying the return current for all three voltage rails (which will be the sum of them all), any isolation of ground circuits between voltage rails used by a SATA device are, again, usually isolated on-board if required. Just triple check connections before that initial boot hehe.

Hope all is going well :)
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
8,107
there are five wires in the sata power lines 12v, 5v, 3v, & two grounds.
Based on that, you need a 3-pole switch, not 5-pole, to switch only the three voltages. There are several advantages to leaving all ground connections to all drives intact and unswitched. Look up the maximum current required for any drive at any voltage, and select a switch with contacts rated for at least twice that current.

On miniature toggle switches, that latching mechanism is not very strong and can be overpowered by accidental contact. If switching only two drives, consider a 3PDT rocker switch instead of a toggle. It doesn't have the optional locking mechanism, but the much lower profile greatly reduces accidental operation.

ak
 

Marcus2012

Joined Feb 22, 2015
375
Who doesn't love the retro appeal of the good ol'toggle ;) You make some good points but I think he's already got the 4PDT and if it's a big'un those toggles needs some heave to switch. :D I probably would have chosen rockers but those cutouts (especially lining multiple up) cranks my OCD right up o_O
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
92
It does require pulling the whole switch against its mount to flip so I feel it is resilient enough for the current job. However a 5 PDT that would be risk less right but for 40$. I'll swallow the risk can't see going down the ladder though. Years ago I had a female friend that owned a brew store and she would bitch when people would talk price and make fun of you for being cheap. Honestly at that time though I didn't have it so I see you! Yeah those 5PDT switches are 2x what I just ordered after mouser shipping o_O but yeah.
 
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AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
8,107
I feel it is resilient enough
Resistant - ?
a 5 PDT that would be risk less right but for 40$.
As above, you need only a 3P switch, which is much less expensive.
I ... can't see going down the ladder though. Years ago I had a female friend that owned a brew store and she would bitch when people would talk cheap and make fun of you. Honestly at that time though I didn't have it so I see you but yeah that's 2x what I just ordered after mouser shipping o_O but yeah.
I have no idea what this means.

ak
 

Thread Starter

Teljkon

Joined Jan 24, 2019
92
Resistant - ?

As above, you need only a 3P switch, which is much less expensive.

I have no idea what this means.

ak
Sorry edited for clarification. Sometimes I feel like there is a gremlin stocking my posts that moves words around because I don't understand that either. I see what your saying that a 3PDT would be cheaper and give more options but I already pulled the trigger so maybe next time. would be nice to have one of those ones where the stem has an LED in it that would be cool.
 
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