Looking for cheap circular saw...

Thread Starter

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,537
And cannot find one around $50; and I know they exist. Mostly like the ones at HarborFreight, but they do not carry such animal.
Must be 120VAC corded, not 'worm drive' but 'sidewinder' , for right handed operator (able to see the blade or blade left ! ), 7 1/4 inch. I use it very little, so am not after the 'Cadillac' of saws. With laser or not irrelevant.
Do you know of one brand/model ? Cheapest seen is refurbished
----> https://www.cpooutlets.com/factory-reconditioned-bosch-cs5-rt-7-1-4-in.-circular-saw/bshrcs5-rt.html?ref=pla&zmam=31282435&zmas=47&zmac=722&zmap=bshrcs5-rt&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIrpP6kMnA6AIVBIbICh2nWwTREAkYAiABEgLd2_D_BwE
Should look similar to these :


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NOT LIKE for lefties :

1585512417440.png
 
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Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,226
Looking for cheap circular saw...

Do you know of one brand/model ? Should look similar to these :

1585514505220.png
Hello Externet

It has been my observation that 'Skilsaw' circular saw products are quite inexpensive and, remarkably, reliable! I'm aware of said products being applied for years as rotary spark-gap prime movers (in 'conventional' Tesla coils) -- which being, arguably, a more demanding 'role' than their designed/intended application...

Good luck!

Best regards
HP
 
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Thread Starter

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,537
I have no clue on which has more quality : Skil, Milwaukee, Craftsman, Bosch, Makita, DeWalt, Ryobi, PorterCable, BlackDecker, Chicago, Rockwell, ... ...
How do you select such thing ? Where do you see the quality ?:oops:
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,399
If you're not in a big hurry, keep an eye on craigslist for your area. You'll see a lot of old junk but some good stuff pops up from time to time. You can sometimes pick up a tool at half price or less. It's fun to get new stuff but you can save a hunk of change by going used.

Any of the brands you listed would be fine for casual use. If you're using it everyday for your job, it might be different, but maybe not. You tend to get what you pay for and there's always a trade-off to be made between cheap and "expendable" versus pricey overkill. They all spin a blade and it's the quality of the carbide knives on that blade that will really make the bigger difference.

I'd look more at the particular design and features that you prefer. For instance I have a nice Craftsman circular saw I got years ago. It has great motor and generally rugged design but over time I realized that the foot - the thing that holds the saw to the wood - is not solid enough. It allows too much wobble and makes it nearly impossible to get a nice 90° cut every time. So I'd never buy a saw without a better foot or at least an upgrade path. Live and learn.
 

Thread Starter

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,537
Thanks.
These left blade are unobtanium at Craigslist and pawn shops. Many vendors have no stock. At Lowe's, they looked at me as a weird animal when I asked for such. The one I have is small, for 4" blades. A true delight to use, docile, gentle and smooth, total visual at the cut line for a right handed , inexpensive at ~$30 :
1585524820352.png
 

Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,226
Put your emphasis on quality. How much are a few digits worth to you?
--EMPHASIS ADDED--


Nice play on words;) -- That said, emphasis upon safety of operation is always in order regardless of 'nanny features':cool:

I have no clue on which has more quality
In my ever so humble opinion, from durability and safety standpoints --among products of commonly available manufactures-- it's: Sthil and Dewalt with Milwaukee a close runner-up...

Best regards
HP:)
 
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jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,222
@Externet What you show may be a left-blade saw, but the safety button is on the wrong side to be operated with the left thumb. With that view, of course, one cannot rule out a button on the other side too. Some current models put the safety switch actuator on top, which I find convenient.

I am also left-handed and have always used right-handed tools, even if they are in my left hand. As for the brands you mention, I would put Chicago (HF), Ryobi, and Black and Decker low on the list. B&D used to be good, but quality went down as it tried to compete with imports. This list of who owns what may help: https://toolguyd.com/tool-brands-corporate-affiliations/

It appears Stanley has bought or merged with B&D. Milwaukee when it was independent and made in USA was quite good. My 4" angle grinder was bought in 1982 and is still going strong. The switch failed about 2 years ago, but fortunately, it had an extra set of contacts (double throw), so I just reversed it in the handle. Maybe it will last me anther 38 years. ;)

Craftsman is also now bought; although, most of its tools were simply branded for most of its life.

Currently, I have Milwaukee, Bosch, Porter Cable, Skil (older), Delta (USA made Unisaw), old Powermatic, and Rockwell (also old). My most recent purchases have been Bosch and Milwaukee. I don't have enough experience with Makita or Hitachi to comment. My circular saw is an older Craftsman (low end), and it is not very comfortable to use. It is very noisy and doesn't have a good feel to it (balance, etc.). On the other hand, my Craftsman cordless saw (old NiCd batteries) is comfortable to use.
 
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Thread Starter

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,537
@Externet What you show may be a left-blade saw, but the safety button is on the wrong side to be operated with the left thumb.
Hello jpanhalt.
From the 4 images I posted above, can see only one that shows the safety button (on post #8) Which is meant for right hand thumb; not as you intend with a 'left thumb' and I own that one, so confirming right hand thumb and am right handed and is a delight to operate contrary to "normal" right side blade where a right hand operator cannot see the cutting line unless some body contortions happen.

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This Bosch one has NO safety switch. If that is quality or no quality I do not know.
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The way it should be : ----> https://www.wikihow.com/Use-a-Circular-Saw

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The awkward way everyone does it because 99% of saws are right blade as this one. That is perhaps fine if you are left handed :
1585578638522.png
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,506
I have no clue on which has more quality : Skil, Milwaukee, Craftsman, Bosch, Makita, DeWalt, Ryobi, PorterCable, BlackDecker, Chicago, Rockwell, ... ...
How do you select such thing ? Where do you see the quality ?:oops:
I wouldn't have issues with any of those brands. Even HF has some tools that are good enough.

I have a Skil and Black and Decker 7-1/4 circular saw that I've been using for decades; though I use my 10" Delta compound miter saw most. I have a battery operated Black and Decker (around a 5" blade) that I bought from a second hand store for $5; then spent $25-30 on a battery and charger.
 
Hola @Hypatia's Protege
Could you elaborate briefly on the above? Thanks.
Merely that said saws' "full-out" continuous operation (i.e. generally two to four hours per 'session' -- often several 'sessions' per 24 hours) -- under very light load (and, hence, at high AV) is bound to 'take its toll' on the brushes/commutator -- Still they last! Which is more than might be said of many products in 'off-label' and, hence (typically) abusive, applications:cool:

Very best regards
HP
 
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atferrari

Joined Jan 6, 2004
4,091
Merely that said saws operating 'full-out' continuously (i.e. generally two to four hours per 'session' -- often several 'sessions' per 24 hours) -- under very light load (and, hence, at high AV) is bound to 'take its toll' on the brushes/commutator -- Still they last! Which is more than might be said of many products in 'off-label' and, hence (typically) abusive, applications:cool:

Very best regards
HP
Quite clear. Thanks
 
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